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What makes Bourbon such a unique alcohol to you?

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What makes Bourbon such a unique alcohol to you?

Postby Frank80 » Sun Oct 08, 2006 11:15 am

Compared to other liquors you also admire and are a regular drinker of, what makes Bourbon such a great, unique alcohol to you (whether drunk on it's own, or mixed with something else).

If this has been discussed here before, please give links to any still working threads if possible.
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Postby bamber » Sun Oct 08, 2006 1:07 pm

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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Oct 09, 2006 6:25 pm

I think it's gross--corn likker just doesn't agree with me. But don't mind me, Frank, lots of folks here love bourbon, and who am I to say they're wrong? Welcome to the forum; all points of view are encouraged.
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Postby sgsoloplayer » Wed Oct 18, 2006 9:39 pm

Hey Frank! While I am by no means an expert on any type of whisky/whiskey, I do love bourbon for a few reasons. It is relatively cheap (compared to Scotch) and can be very complex as well. I like most of the flavors and dont feel too bad about mixing it with something if I'm in that mood. I'll recommend you some more mainstream brands that are definitely worth trying if you havent already.
I like:
-Maker's Mark
-Woodford Reserve
-Wild Turkey (havent tried the "Rare Breed" but I love the 101)

I dislike:
-Jack Daniels (any kind)
-Jim Beam

Damn cant think of any others at the moment... I will probably add to this later
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Postby maverick » Wed Oct 18, 2006 11:09 pm

I don't fancy bouron that much, but the again I haven't had too much experience with it. I think it's a simple spirit, unlike single malt. This might sound strange but to me bourbon feels like a "pop-culture" drink. What I mean with this is that if clubbers want to fancy up their night and still feel like men they drink bourbon with big blocks of ice. I know that's what my friends do anyway! :wink: But hey taste is a subjective thing, if you enjoy it drink it!
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Postby Frodo » Thu Oct 19, 2006 8:42 am

maverick wrote:I don't fancy bouron that much, but the again I haven't had too much experience with it. I think it's a simple spirit, unlike single malt. This might sound strange but to me bourbon feels like a "pop-culture" drink. What I mean with this is that if clubbers want to fancy up their night and still feel like men they drink bourbon with big blocks of ice. I know that's what my friends do anyway! :wink: But hey taste is a subjective thing, if you enjoy it drink it!


I'd recommend trying that with a shot of Bookers and getting back to me. There's all kinds of Bourbon just like there's all kinds of Scotch...
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Postby Wave » Thu Oct 19, 2006 11:11 am

I drank several of different bourbons in my years before discovering single malts, Old Grandads, Wild Turkey and Jack Danials to name a few. Most of the whisky I drink now is Scotch but I still have a fondness for Blanton's bourbon.

Jack Danials is one whiskey now that I can say I totally detest, but I still keep a bottle of it on hand for a couple of girlfriends that come by from time to time. :wink: 8)


Cheers!
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Oct 20, 2006 2:10 am

Wave wrote:I drank several of different bourbons in my years before discovering single malts, Old Grandads, Wild Turkey and Jack Danials to name a few. Most of the whisky I drink now is Scotch but I still have a fondness for Blanton's bourbon.

Jack Danials is one whiskey now that I can say I totally detest, but I still keep a bottle of it on hand for a couple of girlfriends that come by from time to time. :wink: 8)


Cheers!


:evil: I can stand people not liking bourbon (more for me!) -- even if I think it's a bit parochial -- but I can't let it go by when someone throws Jack Daniel's in the mix. Jack Daniel's is NOT bourbon -- it's Tennessee whisk(e)y, filtered through maple charcoal, which imparts external flavoring, before and/or after (Gentleman Jack does both) barreling. Even the folks at Jack Daniel's don't want it called bourbon.
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Postby Thesh » Fri Oct 20, 2006 3:19 am

George Dickel 12 is better than Jack anyway.

What makes Bourbon unique? Well, it tastes different than other whiskies, so I guess that's it. Many Bourbon's have a really nice flavor (Blanton's is divine), and they are often smoother than Scotch.

I think overall flavor comes above complexity; it doesn't matter if it is complex if it doesn't taste good, but bourbon can be complex as well.

Sometimes bourbon tastes better than scotch, and sometimes scotch takes better than bourbon. Depends on my mood.
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Fri Oct 20, 2006 3:46 am

I haven't really tasted that many bourbons but they have always been good. I usually end my drinking sessions with one or two bourbons as they are rather strong flavoured and intense (Knob Creek & Noah's Mill)
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Postby Wave » Fri Oct 20, 2006 6:08 am

I can stand people not liking bourbon (more for me!) -- even if I think it's a bit parochial -- but I can't let it go by when someone throws Jack Daniel's in the mix. Jack Daniel's is NOT bourbon -- it's Tennessee whisk(e)y, filtered through maple charcoal, which imparts external flavoring, before and/or after (Gentleman Jack does both) barreling. Even the folks at Jack Daniel's don't want it called bourbon

Blah blah, blah, blah blah!

It's not whiskey either! The only good thing about Jack Danials is that after they dump their, ahem, 'whiskey' they send their casks to Scotland so they can be filled with the real stuff! :twisted:

That's why they came out with premium American Bourbons/whiskeys ...whatever .....like Blanton & Woodford Reserve is for people like me that have no time for ROT-GUT! :P


Btw,
Cheers!
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Postby bamber » Fri Oct 20, 2006 2:49 pm

Wave wrote:
I can stand people not liking bourbon (more for me!) -- even if I think it's a bit parochial -- but I can't let it go by when someone throws Jack Daniel's in the mix. Jack Daniel's is NOT bourbon -- it's Tennessee whisk(e)y, filtered through maple charcoal, which imparts external flavoring, before and/or after (Gentleman Jack does both) barreling. Even the folks at Jack Daniel's don't want it called bourbon

Blah blah, blah, blah blah!

It's not whiskey either! The only good thing about Jack Danials is that after they dump their, ahem, 'whiskey' they send their casks to Scotland so they can be filled with the real stuff! :twisted:

That's why they came out with premium American Bourbons/whiskeys ...whatever .....like Blanton & Woodford Reserve is for people like me that have no time for ROT-GUT! :P


Btw,
Cheers!


I like Jack Daniel's. I've got a bottle of the Gentleman Jack and Silver Seal on go at the moment. The Gentleman Jack is extremely light and sweet and easy to drink, whilst the Silver Select is fruity and complex.

I like Jack Daniel's no 7 too and as we're getting the golves off I think it is superior to some Scotches I've had :P
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Postby Drrich1965 » Fri Oct 20, 2006 3:34 pm

My sense is that in general, it is a learning process of becoming accustomed to the flavor profile. Many people dislike Islays the first time they try time, finding the smokiness offensive. My wife, for example, thought Ardbeg, Lagavulin and Laphroig to all be horrible at first. Now, she likes the first two, and when I open my next bottle of Laphroaig, I bet she will learn to enjoy that as well. I also was less than trilled with it the first time I ordered it in a bar; now there is not one that I would rate under 85, or highly recommendable.

Now, I am working on Bourbon. I have tried about 8 now, and I am starting to enjoy them more and more. Heavy wood is the main flavor I need to adjust to, and some of that sicky sweet, straight ahead corn flavor. My Elijah Craig 12 went from undrinkable to just about enjoyable in about two months. Clearly, the whisky has stayed the same, and I have changed. Part of the journey and the learning
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Oct 20, 2006 10:35 pm

Wave wrote:
I can stand people not liking bourbon (more for me!) -- even if I think it's a bit parochial -- but I can't let it go by when someone throws Jack Daniel's in the mix. Jack Daniel's is NOT bourbon -- it's Tennessee whisk(e)y, filtered through maple charcoal, which imparts external flavoring, before and/or after (Gentleman Jack does both) barreling. Even the folks at Jack Daniel's don't want it called bourbon

Blah blah, blah, blah blah!

It's not whiskey either! The only good thing about Jack Danials is that after they dump their, ahem, 'whiskey' they send their casks to Scotland so they can be filled with the real stuff! :twisted:

That's why they came out with premium American Bourbons/whiskeys ...whatever .....like Blanton & Woodford Reserve is for people like me that have no time for ROT-GUT! :P


Btw,
Cheers!


I think you got the wrong impression (see my user ID) -- I was defending bourbon, NOT Jack Daniel's. JD is as good as anything to flavor Coke with, but it's pretty expensive for that, and not all that good for much else.
And, while I realize many consider Blanton's and Woodford Reserve 'premium' bourbons, neither does all that much for me.
Now, I poured last night from a 'single-bottle', barrel-proof "Pappy 21" that I got in a trade with the Van Winkles recently -- THAT'S premium! :D
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Postby Frodo » Fri Oct 20, 2006 11:45 pm

Wave wrote:The only good thing about Jack Danials is that after they dump their, ahem, 'whiskey' they send their casks to Scotland so they can be filled with the real stuff! :twisted:

Cheers!


I've never taken to JD but having tried the Single Barrel JD bottling a few times, I was taken aback! Nothing like the usual stuff. Wouldn't go out and buy a bottle, but would be very happy if someone put a glass of it in my hand...
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Postby Drammer » Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:51 am

I'm gonna try some bourbon soon, anybody care to give me some tips?

I was thinking one of these:

-Pappy van Winkle
-Blanton's
-Elijah Craig
-Wild Turkey Rare Breed
-Buffalo Trace

Which one would be best to try for a first timer?

(Well I've had Jack but I don't call it bourbon and I don't call it whisk(e)y either.)
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Postby Jon Barleycorn » Wed Nov 01, 2006 5:57 am

I'm having some Van Winkle 10 yr old right now, and loving it!
EC is nice too. Haven't had the others, but have heard good things about them.
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Postby JWFokker » Thu Nov 02, 2006 12:40 am

Jack Daniels and George Dickel whiskey are not bourbon, because they aren't produced the same way as true bourbons. They're Tennessee whiskeys because they undergo the Lincoln County Process. In fact, they're the only two Tennessee whiskeys in production. The Lincoln County Process imparts a significantly different flavor than traditional bourbons have and shouldn't be compared directly. They're an entirely different beast.

As for bourbons, Wild Turkey Rare Breed is a good one, but how do you want to start your bourbon experience? Do you want to ease into it, or do you want the crash course? If you want to jump in feet first, I can recommend George T. Stagg and Knob Creek 9 yo. Keep in mind that the corn flavor might be somewhat off-putting in comparison to a single malt scotch whisky, but if you drink enough of it, you'll probably acquire a taste for it. If you don't like your first bourbon experience, you might want to give rye whiskey a shot before you try any more bourbons.

*Edited for accuracy
Last edited by JWFokker on Fri Nov 03, 2006 2:13 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Marvin » Thu Nov 02, 2006 12:51 am

:lol: @ Knob Creek :lol:
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Postby Drammer » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:03 am

JWFokker wrote:Jack Daniels and George Dickel whiskey are not bourbon, because they aren't produced in Bourbon County and they aren't produced the same way as true bourbons. They're Tennessee whiskeys because they undergo the Lincoln County Process. In fact, they're the only two Tennessee whiskeys in production. The Lincoln County Process imparts a significantly different flavor than traditional bourbons have and shouldn't be compared directly. They're an entirely different beast.


I know this, I was merely trying to say that I don't think it's good enough to be called whisk(e)y. To each his/her own of course.

As for bourbons, Wild Turkey Rare Breed is a good one, but how do you want to start your bourbon experience? Do you want to ease into it, or do you want the crash course? If you want to jump in feet first, I can recommend George T. Stagg and Knob Creek 9 yo. Keep in mind that the corn flavor might be somewhat off-putting in comparison to a single malt scotch whisky, but if you drink enough of it, you'll probably acquire a taste for it. If you don't like your first bourbon experience, you might want to give rye whiskey a shot before you try any more bourbons.


I guess one head first bottle and one smooth introductory course. 8)
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Postby Thesh » Thu Nov 02, 2006 1:19 am

Marvin wrote::lol: @ Knob Creek :lol:


What's wrong with Knob Creek?

I know this, I was merely trying to say that I don't think it's good enough to be called whisk(e)y. To each his/her own of course.


It fits the definition, it can be called whiskey. It sure as hell aint vodka. Opinions should never be used for definitions, IMO... It just leads to pointless bickering.

I find Eagle Rare 10 to be a good cheap Bourbon, if it is available to you. Wild Turkey 101 is good as well as WL Weller. Knob Creek is good, but may be a little strong if you are new to Bourbon. If you don't mind spending a bit more, my favorite reasonably priced bourbons are Blanton's, Wild Turkey Kentucky Spirit, and Rockhill Farms Single Barrel.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Thu Nov 02, 2006 6:23 am

JWFokker wrote:Jack Daniels and George Dickel whiskey are not bourbon, because they aren't produced in Bourbon County and they aren't produced the same way as true bourbons. They're Tennessee whiskeys because they undergo the Lincoln County Process. In fact, they're the only two Tennessee whiskeys in production. The Lincoln County Process imparts a significantly different flavor than traditional bourbons have and shouldn't be compared directly. They're an entirely different beast...


Mostly correct. However, Kentucky's Bourbon County, northeast of Lexington, is dry, and neither distilling nor sales take place there. The distilleries are farther west, in Franklin (Buffalo Trace), Woodford (Woodford Reserve), Lawrence (Four Roses, Wild Turkey), Nelson (Barton), Marion (Maker's Mark), Bullitt (Jim Beam), and Jefferson (Heaven Hill/Bernheim, Brown-Forman/Early Times) Counties.
All of Kentucky was called "Bourbon County" in the days when it was a frontier extension of Virginia.
Also, bourbon CAN be made anywhere in the U.S., though it currently isn't made anywhere except Kentucky. The famed A.H. Hirsch bourbons, for example, were distilled at Michter's in Pennsylvania, and McCormick's used to distill bourbon in Weston, MO. Virginia's A. Smith Bowman issues the Virginia Gentleman bottlings from Fredericksburg, but it's unclear whether they still re-distill the base whiskeys tanked to them by Buffalo Trace (which now owns A. Smith Bowman), or if they simply age and bottle it there.
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Postby Drammer » Thu Nov 02, 2006 9:54 am

TNbourbon wrote:
JWFokker wrote:Jack Daniels and George Dickel whiskey are not bourbon, because they aren't produced in Bourbon County and they aren't produced the same way as true bourbons. They're Tennessee whiskeys because they undergo the Lincoln County Process. In fact, they're the only two Tennessee whiskeys in production. The Lincoln County Process imparts a significantly different flavor than traditional bourbons have and shouldn't be compared directly. They're an entirely different beast...


Mostly correct. However, Kentucky's Bourbon County, northeast of Lexington, is dry, and neither distilling nor sales take place there. The distilleries are farther west, in Franklin (Buffalo Trace), Woodford (Woodford Reserve), Lawrence (Four Roses, Wild Turkey), Nelson (Barton), Marion (Maker's Mark), Bullitt (Jim Beam), and Jefferson (Heaven Hill/Bernheim, Brown-Forman/Early Times) Counties.
All of Kentucky was called "Bourbon County" in the days when it was a frontier extension of Virginia.
Also, bourbon CAN be made anywhere in the U.S., though it currently isn't made anywhere except Kentucky. The famed A.H. Hirsch bourbons, for example, were distilled at Michter's in Pennsylvania, and McCormick's used to distill bourbon in Weston, MO. Virginia's A. Smith Bowman issues the Virginia Gentleman bottlings from Fredericksburg, but it's unclear whether they still re-distill the base whiskeys tanked to them by Buffalo Trace (which now owns A. Smith Bowman), or if they simply age and bottle it there.


Funny thing: There are no distilleries in Old Bourbon County anymore 8)
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Postby bamber » Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:56 am

Thesh wrote:
Marvin wrote::lol: @ Knob Creek :lol:


What's wrong with Knob Creek?



In the UK knob refers to the human male's lower horn.
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