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Water with whisk(e)y: yes or no?

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Water with whisk(e)y: yes or no?

Yes
84
33%
No
80
32%
Maybe
88
35%
 
Total votes : 252

water with whisky

Postby Janieclare » Thu Aug 24, 2006 11:04 pm

:D YES and No - they are different drinks and each time both are well worth trying and comparing, but with great care not to overdo the H2O.
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Postby Richiyaado » Fri Aug 25, 2006 12:10 am

Though I generally don't add water to whisk(e)y, when I do, it's just tap water. I simply can't bring myself to pay even more money for water than the money I'm already paying for tap water. We have a Brita filter on the tap and, as I recall, the chlorine will evaporate out fairly quickly if you let the water sit a while.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Aug 25, 2006 4:43 am

Richiyaado wrote:Though I generally don't add water to whisk(e)y, when I do, it's just tap water. I simply can't bring myself to pay even more money for water than the money I'm already paying for tap water. We have a Brita filter on the tap and, as I recall, the chlorine will evaporate out fairly quickly if you let the water sit a while.


I'm sure the Brita filter works fine. But it seems odd to me to pay $60, $80, $100 for a bottle of whisky, and cheap out on the water. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
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Postby Richiyaado » Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:59 am

But, but... water is... water!
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:13 am

Sure. And whisky is whisky.
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Postby Richiyaado » Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:32 am

Perhaps, unless it's whiskey.
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Postby Aidan » Fri Aug 25, 2006 11:29 am

I'm lucky enough to have great water coming from the tap. I don't think I could distinguish between a whisky with tap water or a whisky with deionised water, unless the tap water was very bad. I can see how chlorine or fluoride could affect taste.
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Postby StephenBaird » Mon Oct 02, 2006 10:31 pm

generally without, but I've some whiskys that, for me, taste better with water in
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Postby Oliver » Tue Oct 03, 2006 3:52 am

Water with Whisky you ask?
Do you put water in your wine? Enough said.
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Postby Wave » Tue Oct 03, 2006 6:00 am

I usually add a little spring water to a bourbon oak cask strength whisky, but adding water to say an Aberlour a'bunadh or any other sherried cask strength is a definite no-no! Regular strength whiskies (80 through 100 proof) doesn't need extra water, it's already had enough added to them.


Cheers!
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Postby Bullie » Tue Oct 03, 2006 8:20 am

Wave wrote:...but adding water to say an Aberlour a'bunadh or any other sherried cask strength is a definite no-no!


I agree with you about the older bottlings of a'Bunadh, with water (just a few drops) they turned into orangelemonade, but bottling 16 and 17 takes water really well. Tried no.17 with 1/3 water some days ago and it exploded in spices!
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Postby Lawrence » Tue Oct 03, 2006 3:51 pm

Bullie wrote:
Wave wrote:...but adding water to say an Aberlour a'bunadh or any other sherried cask strength is a definite no-no!


I agree with you about the older bottlings of a'Bunadh, with water (just a few drops) they turned into orangelemonade, but bottling 16 and 17 takes water really well. Tried no.17 with 1/3 water some days ago and it exploded in spices!


Good comments Bullie, if you had neer tried these whiskies with water you would never have known.
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Postby Bullie » Tue Oct 03, 2006 3:59 pm

Lawrence wrote:
Bullie wrote:
Wave wrote:...but adding water to say an Aberlour a'bunadh or any other sherried cask strength is a definite no-no!


I agree with you about the older bottlings of a'Bunadh, with water (just a few drops) they turned into orangelemonade, but bottling 16 and 17 takes water really well. Tried no.17 with 1/3 water some days ago and it exploded in spices!


Good comments Bullie, if you had neer tried these whiskies with water you would never have known.


I often get accused of watering my whiskies to death, but when analysing a whisky you almost have to... And as you write Lawrence, if one doesn't try, how can one say you shouldn't?? :)
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H2O et Usquebach

Postby Muskrat Portage » Thu Oct 05, 2006 8:53 pm

Oliver wrote:Water with Whisky you ask?
Do you put water in your wine? Enough said.

(Uh, on Sunday at Communion we do, drat those Episcopalians, eh? :twisted: )
Yes to water as an alternative way to sample and enjoy whisky. Enough to open up the bouquet but not so much as to drown it. Some put in ice and let it melt, others use a teaspoon or tablespoon to measure the water. Once I've sampled it neat, I then add water a few drops at a time ("a mithers' tear" worth), nose, sample, enjoy, then may add a bit more. Or maybe not.

I wish I could afford to bring in water from the distillery but the stuff from the lake here is pretty good. I might add that chlorine isn't used in the water purification process around here, so we don't have to let it sit out. They regretfully use other chemicals that don't leach out over time.

An alternative is to purchase either distilled or spring water which most grocery stores carry.

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Postby maverick » Thu Oct 05, 2006 9:46 pm

I don't like watering my whiskey for one reason, I'm afraid I might ruin a perfectly good dram. I did that once and when it happened I stopped "experimenting"
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Postby les taylor » Thu Oct 05, 2006 10:43 pm

With something like Aberlour Abunadh an ice cube knocks the edge off for me. Most other malts I prefer my water next morning. Usually a couple of litres by lunchtime, that way you still enjoy your whisky as it was meant to be. :) :) :)
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Postby gregralls » Wed Dec 06, 2006 11:48 pm

talk about a lack of consesus - this poll is virtually dead even for all 3! count me amongst the non-water users.
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Postby TheLaddie » Thu Dec 07, 2006 12:52 am

I think you have to be careful either way. When trying a new whisky I always pour a small sample, about half a dram, and try it both neat and with literally a drop or two of spring water. Most are better with a drop, but there are a few where a little drop of water can just kill it a waste a good dram (Tomatin G&M springs to mind). I then pour a proper dram with or without water depending on the results of the experiment.

I never add water to dilute a Cask Strength whisky down. I've tried a few and wasted some really good whisky that way (a dram of Edradour Cask Strength Signatory Decanter was the most grievous loss) :cry:
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Postby Nidaros » Thu Dec 07, 2006 9:55 am

Only for cask strength for me

Springbank 10 100 proof is excellent by the way...
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Postby lbacha » Thu Dec 07, 2006 3:36 pm

It depends what I'm drinking, If it is a new sample of something I will drink about half the dram neat then I will start adding water and waiting to see what comes to the surface. I know it has already been said but you will be amazed at the aromas that surface with alittle water. The key is not to add ice in the place of water it actually kills the aromas and flavor.

If I'm just drinking for the night I will ussually just drink it neat. Too much work trying to add just the right amount of water and after a few drams it is easy to add too much and ruin a dram.

On the other hand a good high proof, heavily ryed bourbon over ice in the summer is an amazing drink. Quite refreshing and the flavors are all there to enjoy. My favorite is Wild Turkey Russels reserve (The old 101 proof bottle) or Evan Williams vintage.


Len
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Postby lapianoman » Thu Dec 07, 2006 8:13 pm

If adding water is a crime, why aren't all scotches sold at cask strength? :P


Depending on which bottle I go to that evening, I may, or may not, add water. I also agree with those who encourage drinking scotch however you like it.
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Postby vitara7 » Thu Dec 07, 2006 11:59 pm

about chokes on a c/strength glenturret thinging about the idea of adding water to it...
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