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Plastic "glasses"

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Would you drink from a plastic "glass"?

Yes
5
12%
No
35
85%
Makes no difference
1
2%
 
Total votes : 41

Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Mar 17, 2006 7:02 pm

If I were going to spend £10 on a special dram, I'd want to enjoy it in the optimal way. I walked out of the Pot Still the other day because it was too smoky - what's the point of buying expensive whisky that you won't enjoy because of the smell? If they have to serve drams in plastic thimbles, by the same token, I just won't drink there.

Of course I drink free samples in shops out of plastic thimbles, but the difference is that I'm not being asked to pay for the privilege.

I can see it happening, though. We have a culture of trying to eliminate risk at any cost - the last passengers on Concorde had to use plastic cutlery.
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Postby sunsolid » Fri Mar 17, 2006 7:47 pm

Never. Some plastics leach styrene (a possible carcinogen and estrogenic) into liquid. It might not effect the taste, but it may effect your health down the line.
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Carcinogenic whisky

Postby Muskrat Portage » Fri Mar 17, 2006 8:11 pm

sunsolid wrote:Never. Some plastics leach styrene (a possible carcinogen and estrogenic) into liquid. It might not effect the taste, but it may effect your health down the line.
Sunsolid: Wasn't there a study done a number of years back that proposed whisky was carcinogenic in it's own right due to the creation process? :D
One of my concerns with plastic was exactly as you point out, leaching styrene, but also that plastic continues to stiffen with age due to hardeners used in the industrial process.
Of course there were also concerns about using lead crystal for whisky containers in the past and the risk of lead leaching into the contents. (Governmental watchdogging and meddling yet again?) I propose the amount of lead risk would be miniscule compared to what we ingested simply by breathing for the last 30 -50 years. Musky P.
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Re: Carcinogenic whisky

Postby sunsolid » Fri Mar 17, 2006 9:10 pm

Muskrat Portage wrote: Sunsolid: Wasn't there a study done a number of years back that proposed whisky was carcinogenic in it's own right due to the creation process? :D


I seem to remember there being studies on tar in whisky and Dimethyl disulfide as possible carcinogens. There was also one done last year on ellagic acid in whisky and its cancer fighting properties. I don't think any of the studies have been conclusive though.

As you stated, the negative effects of plastics, on the other hand, are well know, and reason enough to avoid if possible.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Mar 18, 2006 9:29 pm

Paul A Jellis wrote:Is it all right if I sit in the corner and smoulder?


Q: Do you mind if I smoke?

Groucho Marx: I don't care if you burn!

:lol:


Edit: Meant to put quote from Paul, to provide context. Nothing personal, Paul, you just reminded me of Groucho's line!
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:07 pm

Nick Brown wrote:I can see it happening, though. We have a culture of trying to eliminate risk at any cost - the last passengers on Concorde had to use plastic cutlery.


I think we have a culture of trying to avoid legal liability, which is understandable in these highly litigious times. It's called "CYA". Want to bet that, if the glass ban is overturned, the first person slashed will sue the pub, the pub association, the government, and anyone else his lawyer can think of?
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Postby Frodo » Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:11 pm

I don't know about europe, but in Canada, the ability to sue is highly restricted. You have to show lack of ability to work (see, my leg's gone) before the courts'll hear you out.

There are some exceptions to this, but not that many. I'm under the impression it's more profitable to sue in the US. I'm still wondering why Moore decided to sue Bertuzzi in Toronto instead of Colorado...
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Postby MGillespie » Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:31 pm

Frodo wrote:
There are some exceptions to this, but not that many. I'm under the impression it's more profitable to sue in the US. I'm still wondering why Moore decided to sue Bertuzzi in Toronto instead of Colorado...


He tried...the Colorado courts threw it out because Moore was living in Toronto and since he was a free agent, had no legal ties to the Avalanche any more. If I remember correctly, the attack was in Vancouver as well, so there weren't enough US connections to the lawsuit for the case to proceed in Colorado.

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Postby Badmonkey » Tue Mar 21, 2006 6:19 am

At risk of veering too far off topic here, I do need to correct Frodo on this point. To sue a person in tort in Canada, as Moore is doing to Bertuzzi, you have to establish that person you are suing (a) owed you a duty of care, (b) breached that duty of care, and (c) caused you damage. Access to the courts for civil claims is actually very liberal in Canada. Moore has filed suit in both Ontario and British Columbia, and the end result will likely be a single trial in one jurisdiction -- the question is which one is most closely tied to the tort. The reason for filing in both jurisdictions is to avoid the expiry of the limitations period in each province.

The reason he tried to sue in Colorado first is probably because of the chance of a larger punitive damage award than would likely be available in Canada. As Mark noted, the Colorado courts threw it out for lack of jurisdiction.

Now, to come back to Mr. T's point about whisky glasses, plaintiff's counsel will try to claim against whomever he or she can to get a favourable settlement or award for the client. The downstream effect can be significant. Even narrowly crafted decisions by judges can lead companies to implement draconian restrictions for fear of liability. We saw this in B.C. several years back after the Nike decision, where the B.C. Supreme Court held that an employer who supplies alcohol to its employees owes a greater duty than a host owes to invited guests. That decision led some decision-makers at UBC (Dept. of Student Housing, I believe) to try to ban all alcohol at student functions, even though the proposed regulations went far beyond the scope of what plaintiff's counsel and the court envisioned.

To answer the original question, I would drink whisky out of a plastic cup if I had to. I might do it if was just free and within reach. I might even do it on a dare.
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Postby patrick dicaprio » Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:23 pm

are you talking about a cheap disposable plastic cup or an acrylic glass? i would drink from acrylic glasses but not a disposable unless it was cheaper whisky and and with ice.

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Postby Deactivated Member » Thu Mar 23, 2006 4:49 am

Hey, 'monkey, whadda you, a lawyer?

Oh...oh yeah.

Anyway, thank you for backing up and elucidating my point far more competently than I ever could. People complain about the nanny state, but the fact is that much silly regulation results from litigation directed, not at the most responsible party (often the litigant himself), but the party with the deepest pockets.
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Postby MacLover » Thu Mar 23, 2006 4:58 am

Without a doubt, NO. But the question does bring back "fond" memories of the one gallon plastic bottles that some Japanese whiskies (like Nikka) sell :? .
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Postby Badmonkey » Thu Mar 23, 2006 8:46 am

Maclover you are conjuring up some unsettling memories from my first few years in Asia. I may be an avid proponent of Japanese whisky, but I take no pleasure in the sight (let alone the flavour) of low-end whiskies packaged in 2.5 litre plastic bottles with such imaginative labels as "Red" and "Super".
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Postby MacLover » Thu Mar 23, 2006 8:57 am

Badmonkey, I had a good laugh the first time I saw these "speciality" bottles. It gave me some bad university flashbacks of the plastic bottled wines that I forced myself to drink (as being a poor college student I couldn't afford any better, but still needed some form of release). I can only imagine that these whiskies (if you can call them that) are just as bad and serve the same purpose- to get sloppy drunk on as little money as possible 8) . I never broke down and tried one, did you? I wonder if Ed, our whiskyfriend in Japan, has had a chance to sample one. Maybe we could convince him to be our guinea pig to confirm our suspicions :wink: .
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Postby Badmonkey » Thu Mar 23, 2006 9:01 am

I have sampled them, and I am pleased to say that time has purged all memory of the flavour from my mind, save for the part that screams "stop drinking before blindness sets in". Perhaps the quality has improved since then, and I implore Ed and Smokey to provide us with up-to-date tasting notes as soon as time permits.
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Postby Paul A Jellis » Thu Mar 23, 2006 8:46 pm

Does all this mean that Glasgow will be re-named Plasgow?

Just a thought!

Paul
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Postby Photon » Fri Mar 24, 2006 2:14 am

Paul A Jellis wrote:Does all this mean that Glasgow will be re-named Plasgow?

Just a thought!

Paul


:roll: :D :roll: :D :roll: :D
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Mar 25, 2006 12:43 pm

Paul A Jellis wrote:Does all this mean that Glasgow will be re-named Plasgow?

Just a thought!

Paul

:lol: :lol: :lol:

I suppose since I posted the question I'd better offer my view.
I would happily drink whisky out of a plastic container in the absence of anything else. If I had a choice though, I would always take glass.

I have this week attempted an objective whisky taste from glass and plastic. Same whisky, same day, same time and from recepticles that were the same shape (tumblers). They tasted much the same but I have to say that I enjoyed the glass better. It felt right and had a nice feel against the lips. I then had a proper dram in a Glencairn. No comparison.

(Sorry going off the question a little bit)
This move by the now renamed "Plasgow" City Council is a great opportunity for plastics firms to come up with a plastic that has all the characteristics of glass but without the lethal qualities if damaged.

As I've mentioned in another post, however, this is another example of the actions of a small minority of nonentities impacting upon the vast law abiding majority.

A small Scottish town close to Glesga had a real problem with razor slashings for a time. It was sorted by a police crackdown and severe punishments imposed by the courts. It's all about aiming at the 80%. If they think they will be caught and punished, they may think twice about it. There is always a 10% who will not be put off. They will use ashtrays instead or devise a method of converting the plastic cups into lethal weapons (similar to football hooligans who can fashion a simple newspaper into a cosh known as a Millwall brick)

I suspect that the Glasgow City Fathers have taken a vote winning, easy option of treating a symptom rather than tackling the root problem. Sad to say, but I suspect that all that'll happen is a substitution of the terrible injuries caused by glass by something equally bad and hospital emergency rooms will remain just as busy. I really hope I'm wrong.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Mar 25, 2006 6:05 pm

"Forgive me Father for I have sinned....."

Elsewhere I have confessed to buying a Johnny Walker Red Label, but then I do have a cold and need a hot toddy.


But .......
It came with a free miniature JW Black Label in a PLASTIC BOTTLE!


Aaaaaarghhhh.
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Postby Paul A Jellis » Sat Mar 25, 2006 6:57 pm

WhiskyHammer wrote:"Forgive me Father for I have sinned....."

Elsewhere I have confessed to buying a Johnny Walker Red Label, but then I do have a cold and need a hot toddy.


But .......
It came with a free miniature JW Black Label in a PLASTIC BOTTLE!


Aaaaaarghhhh.


Don't panic, if you drink it out of a glass you may be forgiven. Just don't do it again. :wink: :wink:

Cheers

Paul
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sun Mar 26, 2006 5:08 pm

Paul A Jellis wrote:Does all this mean that Glasgow will be re-named Plasgow?

Just a thought!

Paul


Damn you, Paul! Why didn't I think of that?

Good on ya, mate! :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby Scotchio » Mon Mar 27, 2006 9:18 am

Fools! There is no such thing as plastic glass only plastic plastics
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Postby MGillespie » Mon Mar 27, 2006 2:42 pm

Same thing in golf...I haven't used a wooden club in years, but why do we still have "woods"?

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Postby Iain » Mon Mar 27, 2006 3:14 pm

Can you still buy irons made of iron?

"Plastic glasses" does seem to be an inaccurate description, but "plastic drinking vessels" is a bit cumbersome :)
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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Mon Mar 27, 2006 4:59 pm

Just back from Glasgow and I only encountered one place that was using plastic 'Glasses' (Just put the glasses in inverted commas as there is a side debate on what Plastic and Glass should mean :wink: ). PotStill and Lismore still have glass and I think they will be hard pushed to give them up. I preferred the Lismore for glass ware as they used small stemmed wine type glasses where the Potstill used small tumbler type glasses but with a thin base. Greater selection in the Potstill though but 2 great bars. It is also nice to go into a bar where they don't automatically ask if you want ice and/or water, water being freely available on the counter if required.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Mar 27, 2006 5:05 pm

Pot Still normally use Glencairn glasses but some of their staff have not been trained properly and try to give you tumblers. When this happens to me, I ask for a Glencairn glass and pour the tumbler into it.
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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Mon Mar 27, 2006 5:16 pm

Nick Brown wrote:Pot Still normally use Glencairn glasses but some of their staff have not been trained properly and try to give you tumblers. When this happens to me, I ask for a Glencairn glass and pour the tumbler into it.



It's a pity I did not know that Nick sooner as I and a few friends had a couple drams on 2 seperate days and we all got these small tumbler glasses. Obviously we did not look like real whisky drinkers :wink:
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Mar 27, 2006 7:02 pm

Iain wrote:Can you still buy irons made of iron?

"Plastic glasses" does seem to be an inaccurate description, but "plastic drinking vessels" is a bit cumbersome :)


Yeah, and when was the last time any of you actually dialed a phone number?

Lots of bars will give you tumblers, but it's always worth asking for a decent glass. Any place that doesn't at least have some kind of snifter isn't worth being in.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:48 am

MrTattieHeid wrote:
Iain wrote:Can you still buy irons made of iron?

"Plastic glasses" does seem to be an inaccurate description, but "plastic drinking vessels" is a bit cumbersome :)


Yeah, and when was the last time any of you actually dialed a phone number?

Lots of bars will give you tumblers, but it's always worth asking for a decent glass. Any place that doesn't at least have some kind of snifter isn't worth being in.


I dial phone numbers all the time. I have a red phone with a dial and a loud bell. Unfortunately I also have to keep a telephone with buttons to plug in whenever I get through to an automated switchboard.
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