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your favourite Northern Highlands 10-12yo?

Take part in our whisky polls and votes. You can also post your own polls in this forum.

Northern highlands 10-12y/o

Old Pulteney
8
26%
Balblair
3
10%
Glenmorangie
12
39%
Dalmore
7
23%
Glen Ord
0
No votes
Teaninich
1
3%
 
Total votes : 31

your favourite Northern Highlands 10-12yo?

Postby Marvin » Sun Nov 19, 2006 4:37 pm

Your favourite Northern highlands 10-12yo?
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Postby Lawrence » Sun Nov 19, 2006 5:58 pm

Balbalir is my favourite but I like many of the others and dislike none.
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Postby Wave » Sun Nov 19, 2006 7:11 pm

I'll have to go with the Old Pulteney, a nice malty seaside whisky. :wink:


Cheers!
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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Sun Nov 19, 2006 8:21 pm

Balblair takes for me too.... However I've had very little experience with all these distilleries so it may not be a balanced view???
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Postby Marvin » Sun Nov 19, 2006 8:24 pm

I havent had any of these but I think Old Pulteney looks an interesting one.

edit - correction I've had Glenmorangie and didnt like it at all. Nice nose, flavour awful.
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Postby bamber » Sun Nov 19, 2006 8:30 pm

Glenmorangie 10yo. It may be common but it sure is tasty.
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Postby Marvin » Sun Nov 19, 2006 8:35 pm

bamber wrote:Glenmorangie 10yo. It may be common but it sure is tasty.


Is it? I used mine in chilli con carne! :lol:
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Postby bamber » Sun Nov 19, 2006 9:02 pm

:cry:
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Postby Jan » Sun Nov 19, 2006 9:28 pm

I voted Old Pulteney - I have really liked this the few times I have had it. :idea: Perhaps I should get around to buy that bottle.... :D
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Postby Paul A Jellis » Sun Nov 19, 2006 11:23 pm

Dalmore from this list thanks.
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Postby Wave » Sun Nov 19, 2006 11:47 pm

ACH! There's 1 missing from this list, the Tomatin 12 which also gets a nod!


Cheers!
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Nov 20, 2006 2:30 am

Wave wrote:ACH! There's 1 missing from this list, the Tomatin 12 which also gets a nod!


Cheers!


Tomatin is Speyside.
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Postby Wave » Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:32 am

Tomatin is Speyside.


If a Speyside then just barely being just 16 miles south of Inverness.
Even Cadenhead's considers them a Northern Highland. :wink:


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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:42 am

Really? I consider north highland to be anything north of Inverness. Jackson calls Tomatin Speyside--not on the Spey proper, of course, but on the Findhorn.
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Postby Wave » Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:34 am

You have a Northern, Southern, Eastern and Western Highlands. What would you consider Royal Brackla & Millburn are? They're not Speysiders, not Southern or Eastern and Western would be stretching it a bit. Tomatin is kind of a strange bird since some consider it as a Speyside while others consider it as a Highland, even at scotchwhisky.net they confuse you, they call it a Speyside yet it's not on the Speyside map. :?:




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Postby Scotchio » Mon Nov 20, 2006 10:15 am

This geographic approach to whisky is madness. It makes far more sense to recognise a geographic style but include only whiskies of that style in the poll. Hence triple distillilled unpeated whiskies like Hazelburn and Bushmills might fit in a lowland poll. A loose best fit is as good as it gets. re Millburn I always think of it as a traditional Highland style whisky as it's on the big side and can be quite smoky. It seems to bare little relationship to any of the classic speyside styles and is some way from being in the heartland of speyside.
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Postby bamber » Mon Nov 20, 2006 1:30 pm

Scotchio wrote:This geographic approach to whisky is madness. It makes far more sense to recognise a geographic style but include only whiskies of that style in the poll.


Agreed. It is also the route to the highest echelons of geekdom.
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Postby Marvin » Mon Nov 20, 2006 6:24 pm

I just divided them up by regions to do the polls. The next round will not be in region format.
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Postby bamber » Mon Nov 20, 2006 6:55 pm

I'm not knocking your tournament - all good fun, just that the region thing is all a little esoteric.
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Postby gregralls » Wed Nov 29, 2006 11:58 pm

glenmorangie 10 year is my favorite scotch...but i've only had between 8-10 varieties thus far. i also enjoy the dalmore.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Dec 01, 2006 1:25 pm

I voted for Teaninich, although Glenmorangie would have been the more honest answer. I have had some excellent Teaninichs that were slightly older and I do rate the FF bottling highly so I didn't want to see it languishing on no votes at all. But the Glenmorangie is, for me, the pick of this excellent bunch. I was a bit sorry not to see Clynelish on the list.
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Postby les taylor » Fri Dec 01, 2006 5:20 pm

Dalmore for me I love the oranges.


:)
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Postby vitara7 » Fri Dec 01, 2006 6:59 pm

balblair - i hate glenmorangie, simply because when you go to the distillery, if you dont have an overseas accent they arent interested in you. all the jonny foriengers get chased after by the staff trying to do everything for them. it was the same way at ardbeg the last time i was there.
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Postby vitara7 » Fri Dec 01, 2006 6:59 pm

thats my rant for the day
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Dec 01, 2006 7:02 pm

I found my visit to Glenmorangie very enjoyable and we all got given appropriate drams at the end - me and the foreigners. I was surprised how small and friendly it felt for such a big brand operation.
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Postby vitara7 » Fri Dec 01, 2006 7:09 pm

ive been about 5 times in all to the distillery, and the last twice it was a student and polish student doing the tours.... they didnt know anything other than their "script".

i thought it was a very poor showing by them, considering id just been up to balblair a hour befor ehand and got a tour by the 2nd in command their and it was one of the best tours i have ever been on.

macallan is the same now, if youve got a scots accent there not intersted until you get the wallet out, but when a bus load of japs come in, there like flys round keek.

the wee guys are putting the bigger distilleries to shame when it comes to visiting them in my opion, and ive been to all but a very few distilleries.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Dec 01, 2006 7:19 pm

The quality of a tour depends so much on the person taking you. I've been to Glenmorangie once and got a super local lady of some antiquity who couldn't do enought for us. But my accent is decidedly RP, so perhaps that helps.

I was at Bushmills a couple of weeks ago and it was a very sad experience. There was no production (Saturday) so they cut the tour fee to £4.50 !. We didn't see the inside of any mash tuns or washbacks, although I'm sure we were all glad of the Eamon Holmes video which showed us the spirit safe - for we only saw tha back of it in the distance on the tour. Then we went to a big room with barrels and were invited to inhale the angels' share. There wasn't much aroma, to be honest. I asked whether the barrels had anything in them as I thought it was unusual and foolhardy to store them vertically. The guide, Dolores, confirmed that there was no actual whisky in the room - except in the display bott;e of 12 year old available exclusively in their shop. Then off to the silent bottling plant to see some conveyor belts - and a small dram in the bar. The bar did have some interesting looking bottles but they were not available, either for tasting or purchase. There were bottles of the standard range, but unusually, the tour ticket didn't get you any kind of discount.

I tracked a dram of their 21 year old down to their canteen (£10 a shot in a tumbler) but chose not to buy a bottle as I was so cross with them.

Sorry for the digression. Back to Highland malts...
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Dec 02, 2006 5:04 am

Nick Brown wrote:But my accent is decidedly RP, so perhaps that helps.


Don't know what "RP" means, but get the idea--the first thing I thought was "Nick, you're English...you are a foreigner." :P
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Dec 02, 2006 12:50 pm

MrTattieHeid wrote:
Nick Brown wrote:the first thing I thought was "Nick, you're English...you are a foreigner." :P


At the risk of straying into politics, no I'm not.
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Postby Mustardhead » Sat Dec 02, 2006 2:30 pm

MrTattieHeid wrote:
Nick Brown wrote:But my accent is decidedly RP, so perhaps that helps.


Don't know what "RP" means, but get the idea--the first thing I thought was "Nick, you're English...you are a foreigner." :P


RP means Received Pronunciation, otherwise BBC English or Public School pronunciation. Cast your mind back to listening to the BBC World Service in the 1960s :)
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Postby les taylor » Sat Dec 02, 2006 2:38 pm

Dosen't everybody speak like that, Old Boy.


:)
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Dec 02, 2006 4:12 pm

I was being facetious, of course, Nick. But the point here seems to be that the distillery guides give short shrift to anyone they think might be a local out for a lark and a few free drams, or so it is alleged. Perhaps thry have to deal with that kind of thing more than we would think.
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Postby dram_time » Mon Dec 04, 2006 7:33 am

Old Pulteney or Balblair ?? two of my favourites. Its tough but I would say that Old P is only slightly ahead.

Dt.

P.S. I think Donald Dewer once said..

"If you pay tax in Scotland, you can consider your self Scotish"

But as usual, I may be wrong!!
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