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Whisky or Whiskey

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Whisky or Whiskey

Poll ended at Mon Feb 26, 2007 3:33 pm

Whisky
10
71%
Whiskey
4
29%
 
Total votes : 14

Whisky or Whiskey

Postby fergusa » Fri Feb 16, 2007 3:33 pm

Pure and simple.

How should we spell it and why?
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Postby Elagabalus » Fri Feb 16, 2007 3:59 pm

I believe for scotch you spell it whisky and for irish whiskey, bourbon, rye etc etc you spell it with an E.

I have no idea why.
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Postby Rory B Bellows » Fri Feb 16, 2007 5:25 pm

colour-color
metre-meter
tire-tyre

It's just regional differences in the English language. Canadian whisky is spelled so because of the high number of Scottish immigrants in our past; therefore, I would suspect that Bourbon is a whiskey because of the number of Irish immigrants to the US.

So there is no right way: I think we should just mind the spelling when we refer to the country it came from.
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Postby sku » Fri Feb 16, 2007 6:23 pm

Spell it like it sounds:

wiss-key

After a few drinks:

ersky

After a few more:

iskee

and after a few more:

gimme the damn bottle.
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Postby TheLaddie » Fri Feb 16, 2007 6:47 pm

Doesn't matter. I never order a dram on paper. 8)
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:01 pm

Rory B Bellows wrote:colour-color
metre-meter
tire-tyre

It's just regional differences in the English language.


I'll quibble with that (surprise!). Unlike the other examples you cite, the spelling of whisky/whiskey is dependent on the origin of the drink, not that of the typist.
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Postby Elagabalus » Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:11 pm

This poll makes no sense.

Scotch is whisky

Bourbon, Irish etc etc is whiskey.

So does that mean I you ONLY drink SCOTCH and nothing else you vote whisky?
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Postby Thesh » Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:17 pm

If it is from Scotland or Canada, it is spelled whisky. If it is from the US or Ireland, it is spelled whiskey. If I am referring to bottles from different regions I spell it whisk(e)y. In the end, they are all whiskies. No matter how you spell itt.
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Postby vitara7 » Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:22 pm

i agree with Elagabalus...
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:52 pm

I can only agree with Mr. T. & Elagabalus,

it all depends upon the origin of the whisk(e)y
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You sassenachs!

Postby Muskrat Portage » Sat Feb 17, 2007 9:38 pm

Neither...

Usquebach!

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Postby Aidan » Mon Feb 19, 2007 10:51 am

Slightly off the point, but did the name whisk(e)y come from the mispronunciation of uisce beatha (Irish) or Usquebach (scottish)?
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:45 pm

Yes. 8)
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Feb 19, 2007 4:10 pm

I have never come across usquebach in any context other than the origin of the word whisky. The Gaidhlig for whisky is uisge beatha - betraying the language's obvious roots in Irish.

Jim Murray has a section on whisky or whiskey near the front of his book which suggests that the usage of the two spellings is more interchangable than most folks think.
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Postby Admiral » Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:07 am

HANG ON!!!!! :shock:

Don't make the mistake of saying that it must be whiskey if it comes from the United States.

George Dickel, the other Tennessee distillery, has chosen to spell its spirit whisky, i.e. no "e", and so the reality is that the US / Canada employs both variations of the spelling.

Cheers,
AD
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:29 am

Do you know of a Canadian whiskey, AD?
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Postby Admiral » Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:37 am

Hmmm...I might have tripped on my own words there. I was going to say "US", then I changed my mind to "North America", then I ended up writing both countries. Now that I think of it, both Glenora and Forty Creek spell it whisky, although wind the clock back to when a lot of Canadian whisky was simply called "rye", and I'm sure it was referred to and/or spelled as whiskey.

No matter...my point about the U.S. remains valid.

Cheers,
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:54 am

Leave it to us Yanks to muddle it up.

I think that, if I were in charge of the world, I'd spell Forty Creek's products "whiskey", since they are more similar to bourbon. Then again, I'm not the person to judge that. And if I had such power, I think I'd make everyone spell it the same, anyway.
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Postby Aidan » Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:15 am

The Old Midleton Distillery used to call its product "whisky".
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