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favorite Islay

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favorite Islay

Postby petecaps » Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:13 am

Caol Ila and La Phroaig. I do not like the 10 Ardbeg. Now the Older Ardbegs :smoke:
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Postby petecaps » Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:17 am

woops. Meant to be on another thread. Sorry.
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Postby Aidan » Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:32 am

I like Ardbeg, but I can't afford the gloves that are required to open a bottle.

Did anyone see the Ultimate Ardbeg Dinner on singlemalt tv? The bottle of Ardbeg in the glass case was opened with the gloves. I hope it was tongue in cheek.

Sure whisky just doesn't go with food like wine does. Nearly every chef will tell you that.
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Postby killerwhale » Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:35 am

Lagavulin....
though Ardbeg & Laphroaig are very close.... good thing I can sample all.... unfortunately CI is not widely available here.... :evil:
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Postby hpulley » Mon Jul 02, 2007 3:49 pm

Aidan wrote:I like Ardbeg, but I can't afford the gloves that are required to open a bottle.

Did anyone see the Ultimate Ardbeg Dinner on singlemalt tv? The bottle of Ardbeg in the glass case was opened with the gloves. I hope it was tongue in cheek.

Sure whisky just doesn't go with food like wine does. Nearly every chef will tell you that.


Don't worry, I believe the gloves come with that particular bottle of Ardbeg so no need to pay extra for them ;)

I take issue with your final line, however. Few chefs know anything thing about whisky (I don't believe many culinary schools mention it).

Harry
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Postby Frodo » Mon Jul 02, 2007 3:55 pm

killerwhale wrote:.... unfortunately CI is not widely available here....


Caol Ila is an interesting duck! Probably the least mentioned (together with Bunahabhain) Islay whisky on these boards. I did a small Islay tasting, and the CI CS was not well appretiated. I agree with one poster who said that he/she likes CI IB's but not the OB's particularly. I will say I don't particularly care for the prices on the OB's.

The fact that the distillery has the reputation as a bit of a whisky factory may also have something to do with it (modernized/mechanized).
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Postby hpulley » Mon Jul 02, 2007 4:42 pm

Caol Ila and Bunnahabhain end up in blends mostly and as Frodo says, the current factory nature of Caol Ila (none of it matured on the island) and it being the 2nd class Islay whisky of Diageo makes it a bit of an odd duck. Both it and Bunnahabhain are also somewhat rare around here though the same can be said for Ardbeg at the moment with not an OB in sight here and just a rediculously expensive Laing bottling (but that's the other thread). Lagavulin and Laphroaig are still easy to find around here.

Ardbeg is my favorite obviously.

Harry
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Postby malthead » Mon Jul 02, 2007 9:39 pm

I would say that it has to be Caol Ila for me especially from IB's they are so consistently good in my opinion!
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Postby Aidan » Tue Jul 03, 2007 6:29 am

hpulley wrote:
Aidan wrote:I like Ardbeg, but I can't afford the gloves that are required to open a bottle.

Did anyone see the Ultimate Ardbeg Dinner on singlemalt tv? The bottle of Ardbeg in the glass case was opened with the gloves. I hope it was tongue in cheek.

Sure whisky just doesn't go with food like wine does. Nearly every chef will tell you that.


Don't worry, I believe the gloves come with that particular bottle of Ardbeg so no need to pay extra for them ;)

I take issue with your final line, however. Few chefs know anything thing about whisky (I don't believe many culinary schools mention it).

Harry


The few chefs that do know about whisky know it doesn't go with food. It may go well in some recipes, though. Some people just like whisky so much that they'd have it with anything. So chefs have to come up with the whisky-food combination that is most tolerable rather than on that is actually good. This is just my opinion, of course.

Another reason not to have whisky with food is that if gravy gets on those white gloves, they're ruined. And if the gloves are ruined, there's no way of pouring the whisky.
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Postby bamber » Tue Jul 03, 2007 10:12 am

Aidan wrote:Another reason not to have whisky with food is that if gravy gets on those white gloves, they're ruined. And if the gloves are ruined, there's no way of pouring the whisky.


Tell me about it - I had to use a pair of white gym socks yesterday.
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Postby Wave » Tue Jul 03, 2007 5:18 pm

My first and formost favorite Islay (outside of my covetted Port Ellen's) is the Laphroaig Cask Strength followed by Caol Ila 12yo OB and a few of the IB's (mostly Signatory) which are widely available here. And like petecaps I too don't care much for the Ardbeg 10, now the older Ardbegs...I finally tried the Ardbeg Beist while in Tokyo several weeks ago just after tasting the ten. I don't know if it's worth what the asking price is but the Beist definitely blew away the 10yo!
.....now the '77.... :smoke:


Cheers!
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Postby les taylor » Tue Jul 03, 2007 5:22 pm

Aidan wrote:
hpulley wrote:
Aidan wrote:I like Ardbeg, but I can't afford the gloves that are required to open a bottle.

Did anyone see the Ultimate Ardbeg Dinner on singlemalt tv? The bottle of Ardbeg in the glass case was opened with the gloves. I hope it was tongue in cheek.

Sure whisky just doesn't go with food like wine does. Nearly every chef will tell you that.


Don't worry, I believe the gloves come with that particular bottle of Ardbeg so no need to pay extra for them ;)

I take issue with your final line, however. Few chefs know anything thing about whisky (I don't believe many culinary schools mention it).

Harry


The few chefs that do know about whisky know it doesn't go with food. It may go well in some recipes, though. Some people just like whisky so much that they'd have it with anything. So chefs have to come up with the whisky-food combination that is most tolerable rather than on that is actually good. This is just my opinion, of course.

Another reason not to have whisky with food is that if gravy gets on those white gloves, they're ruined. And if the gloves are ruined, there's no way of pouring the whisky.



Aidan after you bought the 64 Ardbeg you've become a bit posh. I bet you have your newspaper ironed for you by your butler as well.

:wink:
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Postby hpulley » Tue Jul 03, 2007 7:37 pm

Aidan wrote:
hpulley wrote:
Aidan wrote:Sure whisky just doesn't go with food like wine does. Nearly every chef will tell you that.

I take issue with your final line, however. Few chefs know anything thing about whisky (I don't believe many culinary schools mention it).

Harry


The few chefs that do know about whisky know it doesn't go with food. It may go well in some recipes, though. Some people just like whisky so much that they'd have it with anything. So chefs have to come up with the whisky-food combination that is most tolerable rather than on that is actually good. This is just my opinion, of course.


We'll simply have to agree to disagree here. I think some foods go marvelously with whisky, better than with wine, and not just because I prefer whisky overall. Just my opinion too of course.

Harry
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Postby Ganga » Wed Jul 04, 2007 6:50 am

It's not just to disagree. Take an Islay, especially a well peated one, and have it with seafood (see shellfish). I had a truly magical experience with Laphroaig 10 and mussels. Also, I found Dalmore 12 to quite well with spicy chicken.

I believe if someone does a little search you will find a thread here discussing food and whisky.
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Postby mickblueeyes » Thu Jul 05, 2007 4:03 am

I would just like to come out on record and say Petecaps is a girl!
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Postby peat-chaser » Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:49 am

@ Ganga:

Your quite right, there are perfect combinations of food and whisky, but not every one will match.
A few weeks ago I´ve been on a private tasting in Nijmegen (nederlands), theme was lost distilleries and every guest brought a bottle (23 :thumbsup: ).
As a snack besides the drams there were plates with smoked salmon, bread and fudge. Well the fudge is too sweet, so in my opinion it matches with no whisky, bread is neutral so you can eat it with every whisky, interesting was the smoked salmon which was no good with a Coleburn G&M CC 1972 or a
Glenugie DT RoR 1981, but it was a perfect match with a Brora LMDW Sherry 1981 or a Port Ellen, The Bottlers, Ref Sherry 1982.
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Postby Peatlover » Sat Jul 07, 2007 4:26 am

I would have enjoyed the whisky tasting of lost distillery whiskies, although i may have cried all night. Every time I have a Port Ellen it brings a tear to my eyes that it is gone :cry:

I find dark chocolate, especially the 85% or greater cocoa content go very well with whisky - the Balvenies especially (we finished off a bottle of the doublewood the other night). Perhaps the lower sugar content of the dark chocolate doesn't take anything away from the whisky.

Or perhaps it is beacuse, as a woman, I find just about anything on the planet goes with chocolate :D

I also enjoy a nice peice of shortbread with a dram....peaty ones go well.

Cheers!
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Postby Ganga » Sat Jul 07, 2007 5:47 am

peat-chaser wrote:@ Ganga:

Your quite right, there are perfect combinations of food and whisky, but not every one will match.
A few weeks ago I´ve been on a private tasting in Nijmegen (nederlands), theme was lost distilleries and every guest brought a bottle (23 :thumbsup: ).
As a snack besides the drams there were plates with smoked salmon, bread and fudge. Well the fudge is too sweet, so in my opinion it matches with no whisky, bread is neutral so you can eat it with every whisky, interesting was the smoked salmon which was no good with a Coleburn G&M CC 1972 or a
Glenugie DT RoR 1981, but it was a perfect match with a Brora LMDW Sherry 1981 or a Port Ellen, The Bottlers, Ref Sherry 1982.


I quite agree. I would also say that this would hold true for wines as well.
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Postby pavv » Sat Jul 07, 2007 1:42 pm

peat-chaser wrote:@ Ganga:

Your quite right, there are perfect combinations of food and whisky, but not every one will match.
A few weeks ago I´ve been on a private tasting in Nijmegen (nederlands), theme was lost distilleries and every guest brought a bottle (23 :thumbsup: ).
As a snack besides the drams there were plates with smoked salmon, bread and fudge. Well the fudge is too sweet, so in my opinion it matches with no whisky, bread is neutral so you can eat it with every whisky, interesting was the smoked salmon which was no good with a Coleburn G&M CC 1972 or a
Glenugie DT RoR 1981, but it was a perfect match with a Brora LMDW Sherry 1981 or a Port Ellen, The Bottlers, Ref Sherry 1982.


I happened to be there as well :D and was pleasantly suprised how good the Brora 30Y combined with the chinese food that we ordered :mrgreen:
(but that dram will probably taste great with whatever you are eating....)
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sun Jul 08, 2007 5:13 pm

Peatlover...peat-chaser...is it too late to change your names? Not to pick on you two particularly, but there are way too many names like this here, making it virtually impossible to remember who's who. Please, new members, choose a name that's distinctive! I'd suggest avoiding the words whisky, malt, and peat altogether.

Sorry for the rant...carry on, please.
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Postby bond » Mon Jul 09, 2007 10:54 am

In summer my favourite Islay whisky is Bruichladdich. No peat for me there :wink:

Of late, I have been very disappointed with the Bunnahabhain that I have sampled. Bland and watery.

Cheers
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Postby peat-chaser » Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:08 am

Hi Mr TattieHeid,

no, I don´t think it´s too late, but I got this nick in 5 Forums, as an
Emailaccount and in Ebay, so I´m not very likely to change it - sorry.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Jul 10, 2007 12:16 pm

Don't apologize, pc, and don't mind me--if that's your handle, who am I to criticize? Sorry to be such a grouch, and welcome.
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Postby peat-chaser » Wed Jul 11, 2007 9:32 am

Hi Mr TattieHeid,

no harm done, thanx for your welcome, I do like the forum already after a
few days, but isn´t there any thread to introduce your self if your new here?


:thumbsup:
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Postby Adam H » Wed Aug 15, 2007 7:35 pm

Bowmore 17yr old. Got to be one of the most unusual whiskies I've ever had. Very fruity, but enough peat too.
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Postby IainB » Thu Aug 16, 2007 3:31 pm

hpulley wrote:
Aidan wrote:
hpulley wrote:
Aidan wrote:Sure whisky just doesn't go with food like wine does. Nearly every chef will tell you that.

I take issue with your final line, however. Few chefs know anything thing about whisky (I don't believe many culinary schools mention it).

Harry


The few chefs that do know about whisky know it doesn't go with food. It may go well in some recipes, though. Some people just like whisky so much that they'd have it with anything. So chefs have to come up with the whisky-food combination that is most tolerable rather than on that is actually good. This is just my opinion, of course.


We'll simply have to agree to disagree here. I think some foods go marvelously with whisky, better than with wine, and not just because I prefer whisky overall. Just my opinion too of course.

Harry


I don't generally have whisky with a meal as it never really seems to work. However, whisky after a meal with cheese works really well. Especially something with a bit of sherry or port wood involved. (Well it beats drinking port itself.) Or late at night when I'm tucking into several or maybe too many, a some good cheese to munch in between sips is great.
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Postby IainB » Thu Aug 16, 2007 3:44 pm

And on the main point I should say Lagavulin, based on experience to date, though sometimes Laphraoig QC. Will be visiting Islay in October and may have stronger views then.
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Postby hpulley » Thu Aug 16, 2007 6:32 pm

Islay whisky is strongly flavored so I find it goes well with strongly flavored foods like cheeses, seafood and so forth. For more delicate stuff, different malts are needed. Royal Lochnagar goes very well with a brie salad, etc.

Harry
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Postby Reggaeblues » Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:16 pm

Favourite Islay? Probably the one i'm drinking at any given moment...
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Postby Deactivated Member » Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:04 pm

Garrett Oliver says beer goes better with cheese than wine does. Of course, he makes beer. See here.

If beer, why not whisky? I admit I'm ambivalent at best. But as Joan Armatrading said, I am open to persuasion.
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Postby IainB » Fri Aug 17, 2007 11:04 am

MrTattieHeid wrote:Garrett Oliver says beer goes better with cheese than wine does. Of course, he makes beer. See here.

If beer, why not whisky? I admit I'm ambivalent at best. But as Joan Armatrading said, I am open to persuasion.


Well I agree that a good ale is great with cheese. As for the whisky, it depends very much on the whisky. Personally peat and cheese don't really go together but some unpeated whiskies are excellent with cheese. The ones I'd usually drink with cheese would be maybe Aberlour a'bunadh, a Balvenie port wood, Mortlach (only time I really drink it) or a good Irish with a some fortified wine cask involved, say Redbreast, Jameson 12yo or Bushmills or Tyrconnel madeira finish.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Aug 18, 2007 4:07 am

IainB wrote:
MrTattieHeid wrote:Garrett Oliver says beer goes better with cheese than wine does. Of course, he makes beer. See here.

If beer, why not whisky? I admit I'm ambivalent at best. But as Joan Armatrading said, I am open to persuasion.


Well I agree that a good ale is great with cheese. As for the whisky, it depends very much on the whisky. Personally peat and cheese don't really go together but some unpeated whiskies are excellent with cheese. The ones I'd usually drink with cheese would be maybe Aberlour a'bunadh, a Balvenie port wood, Mortlach (only time I really drink it) or a good Irish with a some fortified wine cask involved, say Redbreast, Jameson 12yo or Bushmills or Tyrconnel madeira finish.


Interesting that the ones you think go with cheese all have wine influence. I don't think that's what Mr Oliver was getting at!
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Postby Les Paul » Sun Aug 19, 2007 9:58 am

Lagavulin 16. I absolutely love it. I have never tried any Port Ellen offering, however. :?:
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Favorite Islay

Postby MrAwesome » Tue Aug 21, 2007 7:27 am

Ardbeg, Lagavulin, Laphroaig & Caol Ila are tops. It depends on the moment. Although I haven't had any Port Ellen yet.
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Postby Sherried Malt » Tue Aug 21, 2007 10:15 am

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Bruichladdich yet. Is "Islay" just shorthand for a peated whisky for most whisky lovers and Bruichladdich just doesn't appear on the radar?

Let me throw in a vote for the 2001 Whiskyship Valinch then. And when I run out of that, I guess a Fifteen 2nd Ed. will do in a pinch.. :D
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