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Blended Scotch for Scots?

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Blended Scotch for Scots?

Postby ChaseLane » Sun Sep 08, 2013 7:26 pm

Hi, New here from Midwestern USA. I have just taken a liking to Scotch in the last few years, though I only have one or two drinks a week (used to drink too heavily). I do get the importance of a Single Malt flavor-wise, though I have to say that I prefer Johnnie Walker Black to most of the SM I've had. Oh, I truly love the Japanese Whisky I've had, but realize it's not exactly the same, nor is it as available to someone unable to drive and buy some.

I have only had the usual SM in fairness, around the same price as JWB. Yet, I am drawn to it. Have had a dad in the Kentucky Whiskey business, I am all about how it is made, which is why I keep trying the SM. I keep reading that the blend was to increase yield (obviously) and for export. Now for a question or two:

Is it mostly for export?
Do the Scottish (and at large rest of Great Britain's Scotch drinkers) drink blended with any regularity or in numbers?

Rumor has it that Churchill drank Johnnie Walker Red (is that the only JW at the time?). Does it break down to the point that the Scottish drink SM and the rest of GB drink blends?

Are or people across the pond as crazy as we are and put a paper bag over our bottle so we do not know what it is or when it will end?

Thanks,
Chase
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Re: Blended Scotch for Scots?

Postby slim_chanse » Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:54 pm

hi, here in Scotland I would say the 'normal' person will drink blended whisky rather than single malts. I myself drink far more blends than malts, believe it or not whisky is very expensive here because of taxes and profit margins, a good blend is around half the price of a cheap single malt and to be fair a good blend tastes in most cases just as good as a cheap malt. Johnny Walker blends are expensive compared to other blends and there are much better bottles for half the price. I would advise you to try some of the cheapest Scotch blends you can find and drink what you like, De-Luxe blends are mostly very good and not too pricey, I tend to stay away from Bell's or Famouse Grouse but even these are ok with a spot of mixer (I put a tiny spot of cream soda in rougher blends and they taste fantastic) My favourite blend at the moment is William Lawson's, I can get this for around £10 per litre, much better than JW Black and less than half the price. Blends are very much underrated, some malts are very much overrated.
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Re: Blended Scotch for Scots?

Postby bredman » Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:48 am

ChaseLane wrote:Is it mostly for export?
Do the Scottish (and at large rest of Great Britain's Scotch drinkers) drink blended with any regularity or in numbers?

Rumor has it that Churchill drank Johnnie Walker Red (is that the only JW at the time?). Does it break down to the point that the Scottish drink SM and the rest of GB drink blends?

Are or people across the pond as crazy as we are and put a paper bag over our bottle so we do not know what it is or when it will end?


There are basically 2 types of whisky made in Scotland. Single Malt, and Single Grain. Malt is distilled in pot stills, and is expensive and difficult to make well. Grain whisky is made in column stills and is cheap and easy. Typical malt distilleries make just a few million litres per year (a few make less than 100,000 lpa), each. Grain distilleries can make whisky in the tens of million litres per year.

With malt being higher in flavour than grain whisky it's used to flavour the grain whisky, this makes it more palatable to the masses (so they say). This is a blend. A blend of malt (from one or more distilleries), and grain (from one or more distilleries). 95% of whisky bottled in Scotland is a blend - most of it is made as cheaply as possible for the masses, and just 5% is bottled as malt. Nothing wrong with blends, they serve a purpose and are part of the tradition.

If you shop around you may find a bottle of a single grain (a grain whisky from just one grain distillery), or even a vatted grain (produce from more than one grain distillery). They tend to be older as they generally require longer in wood to attain any flavour and reach maturity.

Churchill drank anything with alcohol in it, but always added lots of water or soda.

Do the Scottish drink malt? No. The Scots drink Buckfast, the English drink malt. :lol:

Paper bagged bottles are never seen here, but many parks and public places have started banning the consumption of alcohol on the premises. Perhaps paper bags will become more common.

Hope that makes sense. My brain is fogged up with germs.
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