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Liqueur whisky

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Liqueur whisky

Postby a4gjw » Mon Jan 14, 2002 3:37 pm

Can anyone shed some light on the use of the description Liqueur Whisky? I think it may be similar to deluxe.
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Postby St.Peat » Sun Jan 27, 2002 2:52 pm

Most usually, the word 'liqueur' means that there is some form of sugar added (usu. honey?), making it a dessert or mixing drink, and quite often botanical or herbal essense is added. Most whisky liqueurs are about 40 to 50 proof (US), as opposed to 80 to 100 proof for whisky. They usually are quite viscous -- about as thick as Kahlua.

Someone else here may have a stricter definition.

Cheers!

[This message has been edited by St.Peat (edited 27 January 2002).]

[This message has been edited by St.Peat (edited 27 January 2002).]

[This message has been edited by St.Peat (edited 27 January 2002).]
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Postby lexkraai » Mon Jan 28, 2002 12:37 pm

There is 'whisky liqueur' and 'liqueur whisky'. The first is a sweetened and spiced drink (think of Drambuie, Glayva, Irish Mist, etc) as Mark described. The second is a rather old-fashioned term for a top end blend, but the term is hardly used nowadays.

Cheers, Lex
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Postby Iain » Tue Jan 29, 2002 10:27 pm

In 1949 Scotch Whisky Association agreed the term "liqueur whisky" should cease on labels?

Whisky liqueurs survive of course, as described by Lex.
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Postby blackkeno » Sun Feb 03, 2002 8:31 am

I thought that old "whisky" that slips under 40% abv is sometimes labled as whisky liqueur.
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Postby Alfred Barnard » Fri Feb 08, 2002 11:08 am

In the late nineteenth, and increasingly early twentieth century, 'Liqueur' was a designation used by whisky producers (both for blends and occasionally self-whiskies)to signify an aged or over-aged product, very often of course without specifying an exact age of spirit.

Iain is right - the SWA - under pressure from French liqueur producers, outlawed the use of the word in 1949 - after which the ubiquitous 'de-luxe' became the name used by the industry for what were in effect 12yo plus aged bottlings.

Alfred
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Postby Iain » Sat Feb 09, 2002 1:51 am

Alfred, you shine a ray of light in the increasingly murky world of whisky.

It is a shame that, like liqueur whiskies, you are no more.

Modern terms such as "Super Premium Deluxe" must send you spinning in your resting place.

Wherever that may be.
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Postby Ize » Sat Feb 09, 2002 9:54 am

No offend, but as non-scottish (or non-english) to me that term liqueur would have a very misleading sound as mentioned by St.Peat. Image

I rather look for age, region and single malt text from the etiquette than word liqueur. And of course, check out the comments from Tasting Room and then form my own opinion about the goodness of the whisky, not by the text "de-luxe" or liqueur. ;-)

Kippis,
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