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Whisky trade

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Whisky trade

Postby goul-from-britany » Wed Mar 13, 2002 5:20 pm

Hi,
I have a cultural project to do on "the whisky trade", and i want to know what exactly i have to put in, like: the history, the fabrication..
The problem is that i don`t fine good articules on the trade, and i don't know if i have to speak about the whisky from all aover the world or juste the UK's one?
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Postby lexkraai » Wed Mar 13, 2002 5:42 pm

Hi Goul

In order for people to help you, can you say more about the exact brief you have been given for your project? What kind of university department / school / institute / whatever are you in? What 'cultural' aspect is expected by your tutors?

There are many many books and articles about all kinds of aspects of whisky, so help us help you by pinning down what you're after!

Cheers, Lex
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Postby goul-from-britany » Wed Mar 13, 2002 5:54 pm

Yes, i can.
So i'm an internationnal studient in Liverpool Hope University College, in Informatic Managment and communication,and the exact subject is "Whisky trade". So..........
And for 'Cultural', they want to know the impact of the whisky trade on the UK economy, on the people of UK .....
Cheesse
goul
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Postby lexkraai » Wed Mar 13, 2002 6:05 pm

Try these sources:

Barr A, 1995. Drink - a social history. Pimlico, London.
Hume JR & Moss MS, 2000. The Making of Scotch Whisky. Canongate Books, Edinburgh.
Weir RB, 1984. Distilling and agriculture 1870-1939. Agricultural History Review 32: 49-62.
Wilson R, 1970. Scotch, the formative years. Constable, London.

Good luck!
Lex
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Postby Opi » Wed Mar 13, 2002 6:06 pm

Hi Goul,

I found an interesting website concerning whisky-trade worldwide.
Look at www.scotch-whisky.org.uk

Don´t forget the touristic aspect of the whisky trade (Maybe you can get some info about the increasing number of tourists coming to Scotland just for visiting distilleries at the scotish tourist board).

Opi
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Postby goul-from-britany » Wed Mar 13, 2002 6:13 pm

Thank you very much
in fact i have never think about the touristic aspect, i think it's very important.
And for the books i have already some of them
thank you again and cheers
goul
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Body

Postby Strider » Tue Apr 09, 2002 9:27 am

I've been asking quite a few people lately the question 'What determines the strength of body of a whisky?' (light bodied/full bodied)and as of yet haven't received any answer which clarifies the issue for me. Can anyone out there help? Thanks, and Keep Drinking!
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Postby St.Peat » Tue Apr 09, 2002 8:38 pm

Strider --

Jim McEwan (ex-Bowmore, now The Bruichladdich), has spoken of body as the descriptor for the speed of the legs of a whisky walking slowly down the glass sides, after the inner glass surface has received a full and even coating of the whisky.

Jim likes to show how to achieve a regular evenness of the whisky on the glass by holding the glass at an angle which brings the whisky inside almost to the lip, then he places his forefinger inside the glass, touching the top of his finger to the underside of the upper lip of the glass. He then turns the glass one full rotation. The glass should now have an even coating of whisky, with no peaks or valleys to disturb the legs' race back into the dram.

Jim says you can assess the heaviness or lightness of body by the speed of the legs. Slow, for full bodied, and the faster, the lighter bodied.

BTW, some glasses can be laid on their side without any dram spillage, and then, turning them on a flat surface, you can achieve the same evenness of coverage ... however, the above manual style can be impressive amongst others, if you go for that sort of thing. Image

[This message has been edited by St.Peat (edited 09 April 2002).]
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Postby bartok » Thu Apr 11, 2002 4:01 am

I think of body in relation to length of finish. example- Lagavulin16 has more body than Finlaggan.
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Postby SpeedyJohn » Thu Apr 11, 2002 2:09 pm

Actually, as far as I understand it, "body" refers to the consistency and density of the drink. It is the degree to which a drink differs from water.

Body can be determined by sight and taste. This is where viewing the "legs" of a drink comes in. Thin, fast descending legs indicate a lighter body; fat, slow descending legs, a fuller body. On the palate, a drink that tastes and feels "watery" is said to be light bodied. The less a drink tastes and feels like water on the tongue, the fuller bodied it is considered.

SJ
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Postby Strider » Fri Apr 12, 2002 8:37 am

Sorry, I have to re-phrase my question. I understand how to distinguish a full bodied whisky from a lighter bodied whisky. What I really need to know is what causes this difference? i.e. What happens during the distilling/maturation/casking etc. which causes one whisky to be full bodied/light bodied?
Over
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Postby Alfred Barnard » Fri Apr 12, 2002 9:25 am

For those of us without a body its rather difficult to say !

AB
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Postby St.Peat » Fri Apr 12, 2002 10:26 am

It always was difficult for you to say , AB ... so , either go back to sleep , or speak with more ... body .

Running a little light these days , eh ?

BTW, how are your legs , oldtimer ?
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Postby Iain » Fri Apr 12, 2002 12:54 pm

You say you have no body, Alfred, but you certainly have spirit(s) ;-)

Back to your quill and ink, old fellow - you promised us a new book.
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