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Whisky and Scotland

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Whisky and Scotland

Postby jmrl » Fri Jun 06, 2008 11:10 pm

I'm starting to re-read books. The Making of Scotch Whisky by Moss and Hume was just as illuminating as first time round. I can see myself reading it again some time. Scotch: the whiskies of Scotland in fact and story, wasn't as enjoyable second time round. But Neil M Gunn's whisky and Scotland proved as hard a read as I remembered it.

Written in 1935 its can offer a valuable view of the industry from a time when little was popularly documented. The author wrote several books and his way with words as well as the style of the day had me lost many times. I stopped using my reading card some time ago and even though I don't ask my mum for help with the big words anymore I couldn't help but feel my education was lacking as reference after reference went right over my head. I often felt like giving up but the challenge proved a test I didn't want the book to win. Fortunately the tone turns with last the chunk of the book focusing on more down to earth topics like production and actually mentions a few drams by name. Don't think Ill try this one again.

I'm now reading Whisky Dream Waking a Giant, much more my level. Wonder what giant they are referring to?
jmrl
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Re: Whisky and Scotland

Postby corbuso » Sat Jun 07, 2008 10:29 pm

The Making of Scotch whisky is one of the most important book in the whisky literature and I do agree on your comment. The book of Neil Gunn is one of the first whisky book and I have to agree with you to some extend, that this book is not the easiest to read. However, I found it easier to read and understand than you described it.
I have just posted the review of waking of a giant (http://www.whisky-news.com) and read the book over a week end. The story is well put together, but I was expecting a bit more from the author than to put together the story of Mark, Simon and Jim :? Also, some parts of the foundation of the Bruichladdich company have been not deserved enough attention to consider this book as a "serious" book.
Corbuso
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Re: Whisky and Scotland

Postby jmrl » Sun Jun 08, 2008 4:12 pm

I've not finished the book so the suspense is killing me as to who the 'Giant' is.

I'll read your review with interest Corbuso
jmrl
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Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 9:38 pm
Location: Edinburgh, Scotchland

Re: Whisky and Scotland

Postby jmrl » Tue Jun 10, 2008 10:37 pm

Haven't read the review yet but as I have finished the book I can reveal who the Giant is....


.. its my lack of patience.

Caol Ila is spelt like that and not Caol Isla.

Its Lomond still not Lowman

and DCL did not own Teachers

Mistakes in books worry me. They tell me there are inaccuracies which means new information can't be used as there are doubts over the validity of statements.

Otherwise a good read. A jolly wheeze, real boys own stuff. How many times did 'Victorian machinery' get mentioned? I deeply admire the Bruichladdich crew for what they are doing and how they are doing it. Others do similar stuff and have done some of it for years but Bruichladdich have a way of making themselves sound the white Knights of the malt whisky world albeit a bit of an unilateral stance.

Somebody suggest to them re-opening Ferintosh.
jmrl
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Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 9:38 pm
Location: Edinburgh, Scotchland

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