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Canadian resource

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Canadian resource

Postby Rob Allanson » Wed Jul 21, 2010 9:51 am

Do you love Canadian whisky, but are just not sure if that new one you've noticed in the store is worth the price? Can't decide whether to stick with an old favourite or try something new? At last, Canadian whisky lovers now have a new and fully independent resource to help them make informed decisions - and learn more about the remarkable story behind Canadian whisky in the process.
Canadianwhisky.org is a new website dedicated to searching out the best Canadian whiskies while dispelling the myths and misunderstandings about Canadian whisky.
"There are so many misconceptions about Canadian whisky," says the website's founder, Davin de Kergommeaux "That's why I launched Canadianwhisky.org to help people explore the hidden riches of Canadian whisky. My approach to this website is: "kill the rumours with facts".
Canadianwhisky.org, looks like a website, but operates more as a blog. "This is a site that users will want to return to again and again as I add new information to it on a regular basis. Just like quality whisky, this site will mature with time." And it's not just a one-way process. Readers are encouraged to leave comments to make the whole experience interactive.
"It's a sad fact that Canadian whisky doesn't get its due," de Kergommeaux opines. "For most people, whose experience may be limited to those inexpensive mixing whiskies, Canadian whisky has earned an undeserved image as bland and boring."
Canadianwhisky.org will identify some of the gems among the hundreds of Canadian whiskies on the market, and many of the best ones that are available in Canada only. "This is not Scotch and it's certainly not Bourbon." continues de Kergommeaux, "Like any finely crafted product, there is so much more to appreciate once you have gained some understanding."
As a trained sommelier and long-time international whisky judge,
de Kergommeaux should know. "That training in how to taste gave me a better and deeper appreciation for whisky," de Kergommeaux writes, before warning his readers, "but if we ever sit down to dinner, don't ask me to choose the wine. For more than a decade now it's been nothing but whisky, whiskey, whisk(e)y.

For further information visit http://www.canadianwhisky.org.
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Re: Canadian resource

Postby anationonfire » Mon Jul 26, 2010 4:20 am

It's bookmarked the only snag so far is every thing is 4/5 stars or higher. There is nothing wrong with our Industry, I can enjoy some world class submissions at an affordable price. I Expect the Canadian Segment to get much more interesting in the next 3-10 years because of what distillers like Forty Creek are doing, Crown Royal Black (have not been able to sample but more in your face is welcomed by me) It's at least a change for and industry that has not changed much in 40 years.
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Re: Canadian resource

Postby davindek » Mon Jul 26, 2010 3:51 pm

[quote="anationonfire"]It's bookmarked the only snag so far is every thing is 4/5 stars or higher. There is nothing wrong with our Industry, I can enjoy some world class submissions at an affordable price. I Expect the Canadian Segment to get much more interesting in the next 3-10 years because of what distillers like Forty Creek are doing, Crown Royal Black (have not been able to sample but more in your face is welcomed by me) It's at least a change for and industry that has not changed much in 40 years.[/quote]

Thanks for reading and for the feedback. Yes, I am starting with some of the better stuff. That's what everybody wants to know about anyway. Coming eventually - preliminary ratings for VO - three stars and for Canadian Flag - two or two and a half stars.
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Re: Canadian resource

Postby Anthony2010 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 10:53 am

Rich in nuance and suggestion, though muted, this is about as complex as pure corn whisky gets, with bittersweet citric notes, lilacs, spices, fresh-cut wood, and hot pepper. Soft Corn. ★★★★☆

Perhaps because it is 100% aged corn whisky and has connections to the old Potter's whisky brokerage and eau de vie distillery, hopeful Canadian whisky buffs sometimes wonder if Century Reserve 21 year old could possibly be from the same stocks as whisky's holy grail, Bush Pilot's. Sorry, but no, its source lies elsewhere.

The distillery flatly denies any connection between the two even though Bush Pilot's was also a rich creamy corn whisky with a link to Potter's. And even at a mere 13 years of age, Bush Pilot's, a pale white-wine colour compared with the older golden-hued Century Reserve, was already much more intensely flavoured. But intensity is only one measure of quality. So are subtlety, nuance, balance, and complexity and in this regard, Century Reserve 21 year old is a stellar whisky in its own right.

There is no rye distillate in this whisky, which counts that out as the source of the spiciness. No, the spices come straight from the oak and perhaps from the corn distillate itself. And without any rye distillate in the bottle, Century Reserve showcases the flavours that other whiskies often bury under an avalanche of rye.

If you are from the "bigger-is-better" school of rye whisky, and your brain's rye-drenched pleasure centres require extraordinarily intense stimulation to be activated, then - despite this laudatory review - Century Reserve 21 is not the whisky for you. Although it has the lush mouthfeel and weight of aged corn whisky, the nose, is cautiously subtle. The palate too, even though it is certainly elegant, complex, and flavourful, is, in fact, judiciously understated. That said, if you savour suggestion, implication, undercurrent, and contemplation, then Century Reserve is pretty hard to beat.

Nose: Shadowy glimpses of corn whisky include dry grain, Weetabix®, and cow barn. Twenty-one years in oak, and perhaps a long fermentation time, have contributed just hints of baking spices. There is an unobtrusive woodiness, much less than you would expect after so many years in the barrel. The nose remains a bit closed, with whiffs of peppermint, an inkling of lime peel, some plastic, and toffee rounding it out.

Palate: Citric notes burst onto the palate with sweet lemon candy and bitter lemon zest. The sweetness increases after a few seconds when a few hot chili notes arrive to spice it up. This is a fat, buttery whisky, but one that feels very fresh on the palate and is loaded with flavour including hard candy, fragrant lilacs, hot peppermint, black pepper-especially on the sides of the tongue-slight vanilla tones, turned earth, fresh-cut wood, and suggestions of butterscotch.

Century 21 is one of those whiskies that evolves in your mouth with no dominant notes but an ever-changing palate, rich in flavour, yet somehow muted and easy to miss under the corn. Hints of rye grain and rye spices are puzzling but instructive, as these clearly come from the wood, while the obvious cedary, oaky notes themselves develop slowly into pulling tannins. And while the palate becomes quite hot, the mouthfeel stays rich and creamy. This is a complex, flavourful whisky filled with innuendo with a constant appealing citric zestiness throughout.

Finish: This long hot finale to a rewarding performance dissolves in a citric mist then fades out cleanly on pepper, with hints of flowers and fresh-cut wood.

Empty Glass: Surprisingly, the morning-after glass is quite expressive, evoking aromas of sweet-and-sour sauce, vague whiffs of butterscotch, sweet citric fruit, dry firewood, and sweet spring flowers like lilacs and violets.

Highwood Distillers is a small, somewhat quirky plant on the western edge of High River, Alberta. It distils a number of wheat-based whiskies, as well as other spirits including vodka and rum. Every couple of years Highwood also does a run of rye flavouring to use in its blended whiskies.

But Century Reserve 21 is definitely not a blend. No, it's one of the few remaining all-corn whiskies in Canada. It's not so much a huge whisky, as it is a substantial one, and certainly nothing like the light, thin-bodied Canadian whisky of cliche. But if Highwood distillery has two primary spirit streams from which it makes its whisky, one rye-based, the other, wheat-based, what gives with Century Reserve being a corn whisky?

Although Highwood ages Century Reserve in the Highwood warehouses in High River, Alberta, in the tradition of Potter's, which Highwood now owns, its corn whisky is distilled somewhere else. And just as Potter's was before them, the folks at Highwood are in no big hurry to say exactly where. Ahh . . . more reminiscences of Bush Pilot's.

Century Reserve 21 year old is gone (temporarily, we hope) from LCBO but is available for $50.00 at B.C. Liquors.
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