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Bowmore Claret

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Bowmore Claret

Postby maltcollector » Tue Dec 28, 2004 6:14 pm

I have just purchased 2 bottles of the old Bowmore claret.
I have drank many bottles of the new bowmore dusk which i found to be delicous.
Has anyone tried both, and if so how do they compare?
I'm not sure when i'll open a bottle although i did buy 2 so that i can drink 1 and keep the other in my collection.

So please let me know your thoughts and tastings on the claret malt.
Thanks again
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Postby Admiral » Wed Dec 29, 2004 1:56 am

Maltcollector,

Which of the "old" Claret bottlings are you referring to?

I have an old one which was bottled at 56%, but I believe later bottlings (including the Dusk) were bottled at 50%.

Cheers,
Admiral
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Postby maltcollector » Wed Dec 29, 2004 4:50 pm

The bowmore claret, with the grapes on the front of the bottle,
bottled at 56%
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Postby Lawrence » Wed Dec 29, 2004 8:43 pm

I have one of those also (unopend along with a port finished Voyage). I was told at the distillery that they had to discontinue the using the name 'Claret' with the reference to Bordeaux casks becasue the wine producers objected to the regions name being used. Glenmorangie seems to have found a way to use wine regions names without any backlash from the owners.
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Postby Admiral » Thu Dec 30, 2004 12:03 am

Actually, I think that might be an international ruling that some of the French have imposed.

Australian wine makers were legally forced to drop the use of the term 'claret' a few years ago for similar reasons.

Cheers,
Admiral
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Postby Lawrence » Thu Dec 30, 2004 1:18 am

That makes sense, thanks for the info.
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Postby skywalker » Tue Jan 04, 2005 8:28 am

I don´t know how the Claret compares to the Dusk, but I once opened one bottle of Bowmore Claret. It has a beautiful nose, but the taste is really bad. I sold the opened bottle after I had one dram. Keep the bottle close.
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Postby Lawrence » Tue Jan 04, 2005 8:25 pm

Was it heavily perfumed, why did it taste so bad? Did you let it breath for a while? Any answers would be appreicated.

Lawrence
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Postby skywalker » Tue Jan 04, 2005 10:58 pm

As far as I remember I found it bad, because the taste impression was somehow sour. The overall impression on the tongue reminded me more of wine. The bottle was in my cabinet for four more weeks, with no improvement.
I have to admit that the nose of that whisky was very promising-lots of complexity. Unfortunately the taste doesn´t reflect this.

This is my tasting note on the nose:

earthy, oily, Vino Santo, roasted walnuts, coffee, butanol, blue berries, leafy, lovage

with water unpleasant notes of ammonia and pigs shed emerge

Greetings

Torsten
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Postby Admiral » Wed Jan 05, 2005 12:50 am

Interesting impressions, particularly since most (other) people commenting on Bowmore have described the nose as being unpleasant and the palate bearable. Your take on it seems to be the other way around! :)

I find the Islay wood finishes interesting, because the influence of the finishing cask has to overcome, or at least combat, the peat. A light speysider will reveal (say) the finishing wine far more easily than a peaty Islay.

I tried the Dawn recently, and thought the nose was quite petrol-like. But the palate was absolutely delicious! A roasting burn of sweet peat, and a delicious drop.

Cheers,
Admiral
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Postby Lawrence » Wed Jan 05, 2005 5:42 am

Do you think the Bowmore line up is becoming the new "Love it or Hate it" of Islay? It seems along with JW Red the Bowmores are attracting the lions share of negative comments.
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Postby Admiral » Wed Jan 05, 2005 6:33 am

Hmmm....I'm not so sure.

Laphroaig adopted the tag, "Love it or hate it" because it was such a pungent, massively peaty whisky. It was a flavour people either enjoyed or they didn't.

Bowmore, on the other hand, is now perceived by many as being temporarily flawed or having something out of balance. (i.e. the inconsistent perfumed nose). I don't think the comparison is as straight forward as it might appear.

Cheers,
Admiral
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Postby Lawrence » Wed Jan 05, 2005 8:27 am

Yes, I see what you mean, it was not the best choice of words although it did nudge the conversation in the right direction..

Bowmore havs been inconsistant due to the random appearance of the FWP through out the line up with the exception of the 25 and older (and not to mention those wonderful whiskies from the '30's :wink: )

It would seem that Bowmore is generating a lot of negative comments and perhaps more than any other whisky.
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Postby hpulley » Wed Jan 05, 2005 2:01 pm

Some have wondered if the toned down Laphroaig is an attempt to become more middle of the road, more acceptable. Lately I find Laph 10yo to be a nice, easy drinking Islay. Perhaps this was the intent!

Bowmore 12yo is similar, an easy drinking Islay. But the older ones and funny finishes seem fair to poor these days, though they used to be good.

Harry
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Postby Lawrence » Wed Jan 05, 2005 5:43 pm

Harry, I think you're correct, Laphroaig is now a more mass market appealling whisky than in the past. Luckily we have the Laphroaig Cask Strength to remind us of the past although why it's not available in Canada is a mystery to me. As for Bowmore, once you've been bitten by the FWP in a few bottles it really makes you shy of buying their product.
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Postby Admiral » Wed Jan 05, 2005 10:58 pm

Laphroaig benefitted greatly from Lagavulin's absence on the shelves lately. With Lagavulin unavailable, many drinkers turned to Laphroaig.

Now that Lagavulin is back on the market, I wonder if the change in flavour profile of Laphroaig (i.e. making it sweeter) is a deliberate attempt to remain competitive against its neighbour?

Cheers,
Admiral
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