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Chillfiltering

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Chillfiltering

Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Jan 07, 2005 2:32 am

Does anyone have any idea what percentage of the volume of whisky is removed in chillfiltering? A chill filtered cask strength (does anyone do that?) would have a slightly higher proof than the same unchillfiltered, no?

Facetious marketing idea: Bottle up the filtered-out stuff and sell it back to those of us who never wanted it taken out in the first place, so we can mix it back in.... :?
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Postby Amir » Fri Jan 07, 2005 4:45 am

its money, all about the money, the higher the alchohol percentage the higher the price of the bottle... the higher the price the lower the chances of anybody buying it. so they lower it to 40% and sell it higher and higher every year... its all about the money
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Postby Lawrence » Fri Jan 07, 2005 6:04 am

The chill factor
Ironically few subjects are likely to make a whisky aficionado’s blood boil quicker than that of chill filtering. Ian Wisniewski presents the arguments

It’s all very well for the militant malt brigade to criticise the industry for chill filtering, but as consumers we also have to take our share of collective responsibility.
Okay, not all of us are squeamish, but many consumers would be put off if their dram looked different after adding water or ice.
Moreover, the damaging effect this could have on consumer confidence, and perception of whisky as a quality product, not to mention apparently ‘defective’ bottles being returned, provides a valid (if not compulsory) reason for chill filtering. Without chill filtering, whisky bottled below 46% abv throws a cloudy haze either when diluted with water, or when subjected to lower temperatures, such as adding ice.
Similarly, whisky stored at a low temperature can result in unappealing precipitation in the bottle (which vanishes once the temperature rises again).



Ian Wisniewski


From Issue 33.
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Postby Admiral » Fri Jan 07, 2005 6:31 am

If chill-filtering does reduce the volume of whisky in any way, the amount must surely be negligible?!

At lower temperatures, some of the congeners and fats in the whisky solidify, which means they can be filtered out. For every litre that is chill-filtered, I would be amazed if any more than 1 or 2 millilitres disappeared. (i.e 0.1%)

Cheers,
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Postby Frodo » Fri Jan 07, 2005 6:33 pm

Lawrence:

Thanks for the article. I wondered why the Provenance 46% non-chill filtered whisky hazes up when I add water. I thought the whisky was only supposed to haze up when the temperature changed (like when adding ice). I realize your post was done for the benefit of people like me. Very un-selfish of you. Thanks! :D

{Frodo half-bows appreciatively}
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Postby Frodo » Fri Jan 07, 2005 11:38 pm

I just noticed something. My new bottle of Dun Bheagan Island 8yr old (non-chill filtered) is at 43% abv. I thought non-chill filtered meant that it had to be 46% or over?
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Postby Admiral » Fri Jan 07, 2005 11:51 pm

The 46% limit deals mostly with cloudiness or haze in the whisky.

But chill-filtering also affects flavour.

Some bottlers have no doubt decided not to chill-filter in order to preserve the flavour and taste of the whisky, but then aren't too concerned if the whisky hazes up.


Cheers,
Admiral
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Postby hpulley » Sat Jan 08, 2005 12:37 am

For an intended audience of neat whisky drinkers or ones that understand nonchillfiltered means it may haze, why not?

Harry
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Jan 08, 2005 1:29 am

But what about my marketing idea? Small vials of filtered-out congeners and fats sold (at a premium, of course) to connoisseurs who want the full experience. Think of it...endless debates on the proper proportion to use...roving bands of congener freaks...people coming to blows over Balvenie 10 with Islay sludge. The possibilities are endless! :lol:
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Postby Lawrence » Sat Jan 08, 2005 1:34 am

roving bands of congener freaks



:D :lol: :D :lol: :D :lol: :D
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Postby Admiral » Sat Jan 08, 2005 12:29 pm

Why stop there? Why not just pour yourself a dram of Glengoyne, and then drop a lump of peat in!!! :D :wink:
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Postby Lawrence » Sat Jan 08, 2005 6:28 pm

That's more economical than going to all the trouble of finishing a Speyside in an ex-Islay cask!
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Postby JimHall » Wed Jan 12, 2005 11:32 am

could someone please verify for me...... the chilfiltering takes place after all the maturing and just prior to bottling and is therefore part of the bottling process?
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Postby Admiral » Wed Jan 12, 2005 12:45 pm

Yes, that's correct.

The chill-filtration is carried out after the whisky leaves the cask and before it goes into the bottle.
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Postby Bart » Thu Jan 27, 2005 10:42 am

The chill filtration was used for the American market. With chill filtration you take out the fatty acids which will make the whisky go haze in cold weather or when cold water or ice is being added. The Americans thought the whisky had gone ‘off’ after one of the shipments got stranded in a harbour during a heavy winter. Upon of-loading the shipment the un-chillfiltered whisky had become cloudy and was send back to Scotland.
Un-chillfiltered whisky is a better tasting product because the fatty acids contain a lot of flavour. This practice is not limited to any alcohol volume or whisky and does not change it alcohol percentage.

If you like to know how chill filtration is done please ask.
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Postby Tom » Thu Jan 27, 2005 6:01 pm

Bart,
How is chill filtration done?
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Postby Bart » Thu Jan 27, 2005 8:09 pm

The process is very simple. You bring the temperature of the whisky down, until the fatty acid solidifies. Run the chilled whisky through a large filter with pressure. The fatty acids stay behind and the ‘clear’ whisky will emerge.
Change the filter with every batch so you don’t ‘taint’ the next lot.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Thu Jan 27, 2005 9:58 pm

Yes, but Bart...doesn't removing those things reduce the volume of the whisky, at least marginally? The original question was by how much. 5%? 1%? .01%? And of course that means the alcohol remaining would be a higher percentage of what's left, although if it's really a marginal amount, there's no practical difference (and none, if you're reducing to a set percentage anyway). But that was the original question.
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Postby bond » Fri Jan 28, 2005 12:06 pm

Admiral wrote:Yes, that's correct.

The chill-filtration is carried out after the whisky leaves the cask and before it goes into the bottle.


Does, cask strength whisky, by definition have to be non-chill filtered?
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Postby hpulley » Fri Jan 28, 2005 3:26 pm

Cask strength whisky can be chillfiltered. I'm not sure it will work as well as the congeners may have different precipitation temperatures depending on their concentration. Its been too long since I took chemistry classes...

Usually they say chillfiltering is needed at lower ABVs to reduce cloudiness. I should put my scotch collection in the garage for an experiment to see which ones cloud up but I'm afraid something silly might happen so I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader ;)

Harry
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Postby Tom » Fri Jan 28, 2005 5:58 pm

Bart, no offence but that didnt really answered the question.
How is it done exactly? how do they bring down the temperature? do they do it cask by cask or marrie them already, in what equipment is this done? The theory is easy, but i doubt many people know how it actually works. I would like to know.
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Postby Bullie » Thu Feb 10, 2005 10:25 pm

MrTattieHeid wrote:But what about my marketing idea? Small vials of filtered-out congeners and fats sold (at a premium, of course) to connoisseurs who want the full experience. Think of it...endless debates on the proper proportion to use...roving bands of congener freaks...people coming to blows over Balvenie 10 with Islay sludge. The possibilities are endless! :lol:


I think it's a splendid idea!! Couldn't stop laughing for five minutes after reading your post!!! :lol:
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Postby Aidan » Fri Feb 11, 2005 8:33 am

hpulley wrote:Cask strength whisky can be chillfiltered. I'm not sure it will work as well as the congeners may have different precipitation temperatures depending on their concentration. Its been too long since I took chemistry classes...

Harry


If the cogeners had a different precipitation temperature, you chould just change the temperature at which it's fitered? Assuming the whole lot doesn't freeze at that temperature, that is.

It sounds to me like these fats are dissolved in the alcohol, because clouding takes place at a lower alcohol concentration.

I think the soponification of filtered whisky fats might also be a good business idea, although I've heard the filters used are partly composed of fish sclaes... This could be rubbish, of course.
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