Not a member? - Register and login now.
All registered users can read our entire magazine archive.

Whisky bars in New York

All your whisky related questions answered here.

Whisky bars in New York

Postby Aidan » Mon Apr 25, 2005 10:45 pm

Are there any? Are there any particularly good ones?
Aidan
Cask Strength Gold Member
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Dublin

Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Apr 25, 2005 11:41 pm

Start here:

http://gonyc.about.com/od/barsnightlife/tp/whiskey.htm

I haven't been to any of these, but some of them look promising. Alas, in NYC, talking the talk always seems to take precedence over walking the walk.
Deactivated Member
 

Postby The Fachan » Tue Apr 26, 2005 7:54 am

Aidan,

There are a few but could and should be a lot better. My personal favourite is the St. Andrews Bar. I think its on 43rd just off Broadway. Good selection of OB and IB plus some Irish.
Have fun.

Ian
The Fachan
Silver Member
 
Posts: 283
Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Scotland

Postby Aidan » Tue Apr 26, 2005 2:47 pm

Thanks to both of you for the info. You'd imagine there would be a lot more over there. I'm off on Monday for a week. Hopefully I'll get to try some of the better bourbons etc.
Aidan
Cask Strength Gold Member
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Dublin

Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Apr 26, 2005 8:23 pm

Being a New Englander, Aidan, I am of the opinion that NYC is the most overrated city in the world, with grossly inflated pretensions of sophistication but hopelessly provincial.* And now that I've %!$$ed off everyone in that fair burg, I will add that many, many people love the place, and I would not be the one to say they're wrong. In fact, I've always had a good time when I've spent time there, and there is certainly something for everyone...but it's a mighty big haystack.

Let us know what you think of the dime-a-dozen Irish pubs!


*I will further add that New Yorkers likely would say the same about Boston, and I won't argue. Indeed, one might say the same about American culture in general. And now I'd better shut up before I start a war.
Deactivated Member
 

Postby Aidan » Tue Apr 26, 2005 8:36 pm

Mr Tattie - you could well be right. I heard the people aren't so friendly there, but it's a place you have to see. I was there when I was much younger, so it will be a different experience now. Anyway, no matter what happens, my wife will enjoy the shopping - especially since the American banks are having a sale on U.S. dollars.
Aidan
Cask Strength Gold Member
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Dublin

Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Apr 26, 2005 8:59 pm

Aidan, to be fair, it's true that folks on the street aren't likely to smile and say hi, and New Yorkers tend to have a rather rough exterior and a brusque way of dealing with things, but sit down next to one in a pub, and you'll find they can be very open and friendly. You simply can't be that way all the time in a city that large and fast-paced. And I, for one, did not need the events of September 11 to learn that New Yorkers have real character when the chips are down. Anyway, my complaints are probably just typical New England crankiness...we've never forgiven them for stealing the sobriquet "Yankee", which rightly belongs to us! "New York Yankees" is an oxymoron.
Deactivated Member
 

Return to Questions & Answers

Whisky gift and present finder