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Rye

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Rye

Postby bjorn » Tue Jun 21, 2005 7:12 am

I'm not terribly experienced with Rye and looking to try a new one or two. However, I am also on a budget. So I'm wondering what people have for suggestions. I've tried Old Overholt, Jim Beam Rye, and Rittenhouse (40%). I can't afford Sazerac or Old Rip Van Winkle. How is Wild Turkey's Rye? (Can't find Pikesville Supreme or Rittenhouse 50%, btw) Any other suggestions?

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Postby bamber » Tue Jun 21, 2005 9:52 am

I've got some WT rye coming this week and will let you know :) I've heard good things about it over at straightbourbon.com.

The Van Winkle Rye is really excellent and is worth splashing out for IMHO.

What was your view on the Rittenhouse ?
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Postby DaveM » Tue Jun 21, 2005 6:15 pm

Wild Turkey Rye is above average value. Very good IMHO.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Jun 21, 2005 8:00 pm

DaveM wrote:Wild Turkey Rye is above average value. Very good IMHO.


Agreed. And don't pass up Rittenhouse 10yo 100-proof if you see it. It mostly goes to Europe -- the bottle I currently have is 70cl, gotten from a friend who works on Heaven Hill's bottling line.
And, I believe some of the Van Winkles -- e.g., the 12yo Old Time Rye and 13yo Family Reserve rye, as well as a "1985" vintage bottling -- are available overseas, too. Any Van Winkle, rye or bourbon, is memorable.
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Rittenhouse, etc

Postby bjorn » Wed Jun 22, 2005 4:03 am

I think the 40% Rittenhouse is fairly good. Pretty smooth with some nice little rye prickles, hints of peppermint and cinnamon spice. I think it could benefit from being a bit stronger, which is why I would like to find a bottle of the 50%. Maybe I'll just have to try the Turkey instead.

Anybody tried Old Portrero? Reviews sound fantastic
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Postby Lord_Pfaffin » Wed Jun 22, 2005 4:15 am

I had the pleasure of tasting Wiser's very old 18yr Canadian rye whiskey and thought it to be the best that i have ever tasted. Until that time my number one was Gibson's 18 yr old.
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Postby Admiral » Sat Jun 25, 2005 2:14 pm

I understand that the Jim Beam Rye has only the minimum amount of rye content required, i.e. 51%.

The other ryes which have better reputations and cost a few more $$$ will obviously have higher rye contents, whereas beasts like the Sazerac are 100% malted rye.

Cheers,
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Postby Ed » Sat Jun 25, 2005 3:28 pm

Hello All,
Hello Admiral,
Are you sure you don't mean Old Protrero? I that is 100% Malted Rye. I don't recall hearing that the Sazerac was 100% rye malted or otherwise. Jim Murray has a section on single malt ryes in his latest book and it is all Old Protrero expressions.
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Postby Tom » Sat Jun 25, 2005 4:33 pm

Cant say i am very experienced with Rye, but last month i tried a Sazerac 18Y old and was litterally stunned. Usually Bourbon and Rye doesnt rate very high to me, yet i keep trying new ones whenever i can, but this Sazerac is fantastic. To me this is as good as it gets if we are not talking about scotch whisky. Rated it 91 i believe. Its also the only Rye/bourbon i would actually buy for myself.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:40 am

It is Old Potrero that is 100% malted rye. Actually, the other ryes, as a group, are probably closer to the legal minimum for 'straight' rye -- 51% -- than most 'straight' bourbons are corn. Most bourbons are between 70% and 80% corn although they only need to be 51%. Most ryes that I know of are under 70% rye.
Last edited by Deactivated Member on Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Admiral » Mon Jun 27, 2005 2:39 pm

Are you sure you don't mean Old Protrero?


Well, yes, I certainly knew Old Protrero was a 100% malted rye, and I intended it to be included in my collective description of "beasts like the sazerac", but it seems I had sazerac in the wrong category anyway! :oops:

I haven't tried any Sazerac yet, but, knowing that it is esteemed and regarded so highly, I probably stupidly assumed it was in the same category as the Old Protrero.

Guess I should stick to the single malt threads! :D :wink:

Cheers,
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Jun 27, 2005 3:52 pm

Perhaps not surprisingly, since I'm partial to bourbons, I'm not that fond of Sazerac. It's not terribly complex for all those years. I very much enjoy the Van Winkle rye, however.
The Saz makes a very nice mixed drink, such a Manhattan -- but it's kind of pricey for that.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Jul 01, 2005 12:23 pm

Don McLean wrote:Them good old boys were drinking whiskey and rye.
Singin' this'll be the day that I die
This'll be the day that I die.


How so - surely rye is whiskey? Or is whiskey and rye different to rye whiskey? Grateful for advice.
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whiskey and rye

Postby Ed » Fri Jul 01, 2005 1:49 pm

Poetry. Good poetry, if you ask me...
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whiskey and rye

Postby Ed » Fri Jul 01, 2005 2:36 pm

If we were to parse it out in more detail, whiskey might mean: Any old distilled beverage that called itself whiskey and Rye might be the real deal. Remember that Rye was the most popular whiskey expression in the States before prohibition.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Jul 01, 2005 2:42 pm

Then he ought to have sung:

Them good old boys were drinking whiskey, some but not all of which was rye
Singing this'll be the day that I die
This'll be the day that I die.

Sorry - it is Friday afternoon and sunny - puts me in a cranky mood. 'Se latha grianach a th'ann ann an Dùn Eideann an-diugh - 'se feasgar Di-ardaoin a th'ann agus tha mi "crancaidh". :P
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Rye whiskey

Postby Wormtub » Sun Jul 10, 2005 11:05 am

Malting rye grain is notoriously difficult thus making the cost of malted rye high. This why 100% rye whiskies are both rare and expensive (Old Potrero being the prime example).

Most rye whiskey will contain >5% malted barley used to provide the enzymes to turn the starch in the unmalted rye grains to sugars during the mashing process.

In addition to this unmalted rye grain is very sticky when mashed (giving poor mash tun drainage) and requires higher sparge temps, which can affect the enzyme activity of the malted barley.

So most distilleries take the safer options of the 51% rye in the mashbill required to legally call the finished whiskey a rye whisky....its a pure question of economics


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