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1 liter bottles

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1 liter bottles

Postby lambda » Fri Sep 16, 2005 10:25 pm

I am rather impartial to 1 liter bottles compared to 0.7 liter bottles. They offer more whisky :roll:, however, they look rather cheap on my shelf next to a bunch of 0.7 bottles. I know, it is a pathologic point, but nonetheless, I prefer to buy 0.7l bottles.

What is strange is that the 1 liter bottles do not always contain the same whisky as the 0.7l bottles. At least the alcohol content is sometimes different. For example, the laphroaig 0.7l has 40%, while the 1l has 43%. I have tasted them head-to-head and I definately prefer the 43% version. The difference is quite obvious. Tonight, I bought a liter of 17yo Ardbeg for a friendly price, which is also at 43%. Afaik, the same 0.7l was at 40%.

So I'm wondering why they do this. The 1l laphroaig is relatively cheap compared to the 0.7l, so what is the point of lowering the alcohol percentage of the 0.7l as well?
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Postby Admiral » Fri Sep 16, 2005 11:14 pm

One litre bottlings are usually produced for the duty free market, and so they are catering for ABV limitations or requirements that may be different to the EU.

Cheers,
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Sep 17, 2005 2:46 am

The .75l (US) bottle of Ardbeg 17 that I have is 43%. I believe that was the standard strength.

I occasionally get 1l bottles at duty free shops, and haven't noticed any differences. But Admiral's right, sometimes duty-free bottlings are done specifically for duty free shops, and are not quite the same stuff. Where are you getting yours?

I also occasionally get 1.14l bottles--I believe this is a remnant of Canada's use of imperial measure. The equivalent measure is, I presume, written into the import regs.

Addendum: 1.14l (or actually a hair less--I sometimes see these marked 1.13) is indeed equal to one imperial quart. I have a Laphroaig 10 (1.14) and Macallan 12 (1.13) in my inventory, both acquired at duty free shops entering Canada. Both are unopened. I believe I also had a Glenfiddich in that size, back before I started keeping inventory. Of course I declared these when reentering the US! :roll:
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Postby kallaskander » Sat Sep 17, 2005 7:40 am

Hi there,

the lower limit for whisky is 40% abv in most whisky producing countries. And many OBs and IBs have used that minimal standard because it yields more bottles and it makes these bottles cheaper.
For export 43% was used quite often because foreign markets demanded that strength. As to "where and why" is one of these whisky mysteries everyone knows about but nobody can explain.
Probably one more time honoured custom and the origins are lost in time and space. But 1 litre duty free bottles often are bottled with a strength of 43% abv. Could be pure generosity on the side of the bottlers: what they safed in tax and duty they passed on to us in alcohol strength at the same price.
No, unlikely there is no such altruism? Pitty.

Greetings
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Postby SpiritofShetland » Sat Sep 17, 2005 8:02 pm

Mr Tattie you're quite right. Some distillers bottled a quart size at times. My Mrs had a Glenlivet 1.14l bottle once (gone now).

As for the duty-free marked, that's mainly litre-bottles (so travelers can get the most of their duty-free allowance). And some distillers deliver higher strengths. Glenfiddich is actually onje of those, at leaste at the duty-free shops here in Norway the standard Glenfiddichs all are bottled at 43%.

Another excample in The BenRiach. They bottle at 40% for the UK and Swedish markeds, but at 43 and 46% for the others. Mr Walker himself said it simply was down to the taxrate.
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Postby lambda » Sun Sep 18, 2005 12:09 am

Thanks for all replies. I indeed bought laphroaig bottles duty free (at the airport, and one at a military base 8)). The ardbeg was not duty-free however. A guy with a great whisky collection who used to be a whisky retailer was nice enough to sell one of his bottles to me for a price that he paid himself a few years ago.

I guess most 1l bottles are the same (duty free or not), but mostly sold at duty-free shops and therefor at a slightly higher ABV. Anyway, it is nice fact to take into account during my next trip.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sun Sep 18, 2005 3:08 am

Yes, very interesting. Worth keeping the eyes open for 43% duty-free bottlings of some of our 40% favorites.
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Postby Admiral » Mon Sep 19, 2005 4:34 am

We here in Oz used to get 43% Macallan bottlings.

Now we have been dealt a double blow.....not only are they not giving us the sherry range now (it's Fine Oak only), but they're giving it to us at 40%.

Despite the high duty and excise on alcohol in this country, I noticed the price didn't come down with the lower strength bottlings! :wink: :roll:

Cheers,
Admiral
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Postby Crispy Critter » Mon Sep 19, 2005 5:06 am

Admiral wrote:Despite the high duty and excise on alcohol in this country, I noticed the price didn't come down with the lower strength bottlings!


I've noticed this here also; Wild Turkey Russell's Reserve used to be 50.5%, but the new bottling has been dropped to 45%. The price hasn't gone down, though.
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Postby kallaskander » Mon Sep 19, 2005 7:41 am

Hi there,

yes Admiral, Sir that strikes me as not justified, too. Here the 12 year fine oak has the same price as the 12 year old sherry bottling and both are 40%abv.
If a sherry cask is ten times the price of a bourbon cask the 12 year sherry bottling should be more expensive then the sherry/bourbon vatting. If not, why is the vatting the same price?
That is the case with all bottlings of fine oak and sherry in all age groups: no difference in price.

Greetings
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1 Liter bottles

Postby Froagi » Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:34 am

oh this just keeps getting better and better. I have yet to enter a duty free shop while traveling. first time coming in March 06. can hardly wait to see what 1 liter bottles of scotch are available. thanks for the good news guys.

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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Oct 01, 2005 12:32 pm

kallaskander wrote:Hi there,

yes Admiral, Sir that strikes me as not justified, too. Here the 12 year fine oak has the same price as the 12 year old sherry bottling and both are 40%abv.
If a sherry cask is ten times the price of a bourbon cask the 12 year sherry bottling should be more expensive then the sherry/bourbon vatting. If not, why is the vatting the same price?
That is the case with all bottlings of fine oak and sherry in all age groups: no difference in price.

Greetings
kallaskander


Cost of raw ingredients is probably the smallest factor in pricing. Tax will account for a lot of it, and that will be the same for either bottle. Market conditions, or what Macallan perceive as market conditions, or what Macallan want you to perceive as market conditions, will determine actual price. That's why distilleries are loathe to use expensive things like sherry casks and Golden Promise, because they know they won't be able to charge any more in the marketplace. If they tell you different, it's merely an attempt to influence that marketplace. Macallan have actually done a good job of this in the past, but I think it's swung around and hitting them in the backside; they are victims of their own propaganda, in that they've convinced a lot of people that their product is worth a few extra shekels because of the expensive ingredients, and now people like you are asking the questions that logically follow when the product changes. The result is angry Reviloism from people who bought all the bs.
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Re:

Postby woodhill » Tue Oct 23, 2007 7:26 pm

SpiritofShetland wrote:Mr Tattie you're quite right. Some distillers bottled a quart size at times. My Mrs had a Glenlivet 1.14l bottle once (gone now).

As for the duty-free marked, that's mainly litre-bottles (so travelers can get the most of their duty-free allowance). And some distillers deliver higher strengths. Glenfiddich is actually onje of those, at leaste at the duty-free shops here in Norway the standard Glenfiddichs all are bottled at 43%.

Another excample in The BenRiach. They bottle at 40% for the UK and Swedish markeds, but at 43 and 46% for the others. Mr Walker himself said it simply was down to the taxrate.



A friend of mine found a 1.14 litre bottle of the aforementioned Glenlivet in his cellar,

couple of questions please if I may?

1. Whats it worth?
2. How old is it?
3. Drink/Sell/Keep

Thanks as always for your valuable advice!
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Re: 1 liter bottles

Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Jan 30, 2008 12:08 pm

I'm going to Edmonton in Canada next week from Glasgow and will be looking to buy a litre of something. Any suggestions? And if the litre bottles are different strengths will this make them more collectible (that and the fact that they're in a bigger bottle)?
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Re: 1 liter bottles

Postby Ganga » Wed Jan 30, 2008 6:41 pm

When my mother-in-law went to NZ I had her bring back two bottles of whisky from duty free. NZ had a duty free website that you could check to see what was available. Based upon my review, I sent her a list of things to choose from including the Macallan Elegancia and the Glenfiddich 15 CS, two whiskies I could not purchase here.

http://www.dutyfree.ca/ shows at least a partial list. Personally, I would select something like the Dalmore Black Pearl that is made strictly for duty free shops.
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