Not a member? - Register and login now.
All registered users can read our entire magazine archive.

J&B -6 ℃

All your whisky related questions answered here.

J&B -6 ℃

Postby nebula21 » Sat Oct 29, 2005 10:33 am

Image

hi all

i found a bottle of strange J&B -6℃ on web(http://www.whiskyauction.com)

i want some information about this whisky.

how can it is possble that this whisky clear like vodka? chill filtering?

what's mean -6℃?
Last edited by nebula21 on Sat Oct 29, 2005 10:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
nebula21
New member
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2005 11:26 am

Postby SpiritofShetland » Sat Oct 29, 2005 10:55 am

You've got it, it's heavy duty chill-filtration.

I guess the -6°C reflects on the recommended drinking-temperature, or more likely the temperature they've chill-filtered it at.

It's really a whisky ment for cocktails. Can be bought a most whiskyretailers for just over £15.
SpiritofShetland
Silver Member
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2004 3:32 pm
Location: Trondheim, Norway

Postby Aidan » Sat Oct 29, 2005 11:15 am

Yes, there was a "Welsh" whisky that was clear too. I think it was distilled in Scotland and processed in Wales, so there was some controversy about it being called Welsh whisky.

I have also seen clear Powers for sale, but I'm unsure if it's real or not...
Aidan
Cask Strength Gold Member
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Dublin

Postby SpiritofShetland » Sat Oct 29, 2005 11:38 am

Not Welsh - Manxian. From the Isle of Man - Glen Kella.

It was re-distilled on the Isle of Man and then promptly bottled. In 1997 UDV/Allied and SWA took Glen Kella to court, since calling it whisky (or did they call it whiskey?) implied it had spent at least three years in casks after distillation.

After losing the case GLen Kella now markets it's product as ManX Spirit.

http://www.manx-spirit.com/
SpiritofShetland
Silver Member
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2004 3:32 pm
Location: Trondheim, Norway

Postby Aidan » Sat Oct 29, 2005 11:54 am

SpiritofShetland wrote:Not Welsh - Manxian. From the Isle of Man - Glen Kella.

It was re-distilled on the Isle of Man and then promptly bottled. In 1997 UDV/Allied and SWA took Glen Kella to court, since calling it whisky (or did they call it whiskey?) implied it had spent at least three years in casks after distillation.

After losing the case GLen Kella now markets it's product as ManX Spirit.

http://www.manx-spirit.com/


You're absolutely right, of course. I remember now.

I had some and it was surprisingly malty. I quite liked it.
Aidan
Cask Strength Gold Member
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Dublin

Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Oct 29, 2005 3:15 pm

As long as they're filtering out all the stuff that makes it interesting (and which they spent at least three years getting into it), why don't they get rid of that nasty alcohol, as well? Then they could market it as, oh I don't know, "Highland Spring" or something like that.
Deactivated Member
 

Postby Jan » Sat Oct 29, 2005 9:38 pm

Actually it is mentioned in the blends article in WM 51. Apparently it is a "designer blend" meant to appeal to drinkers in their 20s and to compete with vodka and other white spirits.

The mention of this blend ends with:

As a reader of Whisky Magazine, you probably won't drink it, but then it's not designed for you.



/Jan
Jan
Gold Member
 
Posts: 965
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 9:15 pm
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

Postby Admiral » Sun Oct 30, 2005 12:14 am

As a reader of Whisky Magazine, you probably won't drink it, but then it's not designed for you.


Amen.

Amazing how colour is perceived to be such a marketing too. We've discussed ad-nauseum the addition of caramel to malts to make them seem more appealing, but I guess this is the other extreme....taking the colour out in order to appeal to those who prefer white spirits.

Such a shame that we taste with our eyes.

Cheers,
Admiral
Admiral
Triple Gold Member
 
Posts: 2722
Joined: Wed Jan 08, 2003 2:01 am
Location: Australia

Postby Aidan » Sun Oct 30, 2005 1:00 am

Yeah, and probably the most significant visual signal is the name on the label. Make blind tasting compulsory, I say.
Aidan
Cask Strength Gold Member
 
Posts: 3252
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Dublin

Postby Richy_1984 » Wed Nov 09, 2005 1:08 am

Hello all, i'm a student at the Univerisity of Derby and am currently working on a design project for this new whiskey, J&B -6 (Degrees Celcius) and how it can be marketed to younger people (age 25-35)
Have any of you tasted the new blend? how is it?
Any feedback on the whiskey whether it be what you think of the look, taste, style, idea would be of great help. I agree how weird it seems the way we taste with our eyes and this could be a good starting point for my ad campaign, I appreciate any views shared,
Thanks again

Richard
Richy_1984
New member
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2005 12:57 am

Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Nov 09, 2005 6:20 am

Hi, Richy. Please don't take offense, but this strikes me as what is called "barking up the wrong tree". This product is not aimed at people who actually like whisky. Come to think of it, maybe that's your hook: "Whisky for people who don't like whisky."
Deactivated Member
 

Postby mar_mcdo » Wed Nov 09, 2005 11:09 am

I've tried the -6 and wasnt taken with it, not that i thought i would be. didnt taste like whisky, more like a good vodka. they cooled the spirit to -6 deg C in order to precipitate out alot of the proteins and fatty acids present in the whisky then filtered it, thereby getting rid of them. this is a lower temperature than is usually used for chill filtration i think, so i imagine that it took out some of the colour compounds aswell. i also presume that old casks that have been filled many times were used for maturation so the whisky probably didnt have a huge amount of coulour to begin with. we got it into work (SWHC) and were told they were mainly marketing it for mixing and cocktails, trying to reach a new market - non-whisky drinkers.
mar_mcdo
New member
 
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 4:09 pm
Location: speyside

Postby Richy_1984 » Thu Nov 10, 2005 1:37 am

Thanks for these responses, it seems the more I research, the more I realise what a vast subject whisky/whiskey is!

Tattiehead, no offense taken. I understand that this whisky is aimed that those who don't normally drink it but posted on here to get an overall impression of why whisky drinkers drink whisky as opposed to say, a pint! Would you not drink this whisky because you've heard its meant to be for the non whisky drinker? Is it that because it doesn't look like whisky or have you tried it and simply not like the taste? thanks again for your reply.

Mar_mcdo, I find it interesting that you say it TASTES like vodka, it certainly looks like one and understand this whole vodka theme is J&B's intention to get the non whisky drinker to give it a try. I've decided to buy a bottle of -6 if I can find it not because I don't beleive you but because I am now intrigued. thanks again.

My lecturer today gave a good analogy of the whisky, if you were to give a pint of what looked like water (but still tasted like a beer) to a beer drinker would they still drink it. I know this whisky is not intended for the whisky drinker but do you find it hard to accept as a whisky purely for the fact it doesn't look like one? Being a Beer drinker myself I would be rather cautious about drinking a pint of beer which looked like water!

lastly I apologise for misspelling whisky (whiskey) when referring to scotch and appreciate any further views on the new whisky, cheers, Richard
Richy_1984
New member
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2005 12:57 am

Postby Deactivated Member » Thu Nov 10, 2005 2:23 am

Richy_1984 wrote:I understand that this whisky is aimed that those who don't normally drink it but posted on here to get an overall impression of why whisky drinkers drink whisky as opposed to say, a pint!


Well, I enjoy both. But the dram is at my left hand and the pint is at my right, so I guess you could say they are opposed.

Richy_1984 wrote:Is it that because it doesn't look like whisky or have you tried it and simply not like the taste?...My lecturer today gave a good analogy of the whisky, if you were to give a pint of what looked like water (but still tasted like a beer) to a beer drinker would they still drink it....Being a Beer drinker myself I would be rather cautious about drinking a pint of beer which looked like water!


This has been done--it's called Zima here in the States, a beer so heavily filtered that it has no color or flavor. (Considering the flavor of the base beer, that's not entirely a bad thing.) It's often drunk with a shot of Chambord or some other fruity liqueur. And, fairly enough, they don't call it beer, partly because it isn't really, but mostly because they are trying to sell it to people who don't want beer. And so it is with this: they are trying to sell it to people who don't want whisky, and in my mind it isn't really whisky, anyway; so they should call it something other than "blended Scotch whisky". Maybe "distilled malt beverage".

The question of appearance is on its face absurd--a beer (or whisky) without color could not possibly what we think of as beer (or whisky). It has been stripped of essential ingredients which happen to have color. And yet, on a subtler level, this is a question we have been talking about for as long as I've been on this forum, and I'm sure far longer. There is a widespread perception that whisky should be dark. It can in fact range from pale white wine color to mahogany, quite naturally--the color (and a significant amount of flavor) comes from the barrels in which it is aged (new-make spirit is as clear as vodka). But many whiskies are color-enhanced with a substance called spirit caramel, which most of us enthusiasts believe can be detrimental to the flavor, if overused (some believe if used at all). Supposedly it is done just to ensure uniformity of color, but there is no doubt that some whiskies, and particularly blends, are colored quite heavily, largely because of the perception in the industry that there is a perception among the public that whisky is supposed to be dark, and the darker it is, the higher quality it is.

So here we are now with a product that stands that logic (flawed as it is) on its head. As I said, I think they ought simply to call it something else, both because it is, and because it's probably better marketing. I'd suggest "malt liquor", but that's already a bogus legal term in the States for overstrength beer.

Anyway, I predict rapid oblivion for this product, like Jackson's Row. I just don't see the point. It has to be a whole lot cheaper just to make vodka in the first place. It's all image and marketing, anyway, so what difference does it make what's actually in the bottle?

But if you can sell this, Richy, then I'd say you can sell refrigerators to the Inuit!


Edit: Going back over the thread, I see that Admiral already touched on the issue of color. Personally, I see nothing wrong with the visual enjoyment of whisky's (or beer's or wine's or anything else's) natural color. It's kind of like breast implants--they can make you say "wow", but you know they aren't real.
Deactivated Member
 

Postby kallaskander » Thu Nov 10, 2005 9:18 am

Hi there,

the concept itself is nothing new. The industry claims for years now that white spirits like vodka compete successfully with brown spirits like whisky and cognac for the first place. In case of cognac they won, but the other brown spirit fighting back fiercely is rum.
Richy if you want to avoid mistakes in marketing this new stuff take a look into the promotion of Hackler. That was an Irish white whiskey which tried to do something paradox.
In order to compete with vodka Hackler and other white whiskies by the way, tried to give the impression to be potcheen. i.e. illegally distilled whiskies, fresh from the stills not matured, wild dangerous and ilicit.
The concept failed for many reasons. But one was that you hardly buy moonshine from a supermarket shelf.
If it is of help to you look into the marketing schemes of the Hackler and at least one other named Poiteen which failed as "white whiskies" already.

Greetings
kallaskander
kallaskander
Double Gold Member
 
Posts: 1119
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2005 12:47 pm
Location: Heddesheim, Germany

Return to Questions & Answers

Whisky gift and present finder