Not a member? - Register and login now.
All registered users can read our entire magazine archive.

Which is the best singe malt to combine with haggis?

All your whisky related questions answered here.

Which is the best singe malt to combine with haggis?

Postby Mickeman » Tue Dec 27, 2005 1:41 pm

Which is the best singe malt to combine with haggis?


I have only tested Glenmorangie 10 which was ok to the haggis.

I imagine that a typical Islay whisky is too pungent?

I would like a dram that doesn't overpower the aroma and taste of the haggis but rather makes combinations that increase the enjoyment of both the whisky and the haggis.
Mickeman
New member
 
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 11:44 am

Postby SpiritofShetland » Tue Dec 27, 2005 2:12 pm

Don't you just love it when somebody answeres a question like this:

That depends...

But it actually does, on to thing to be precise. How spicy the haggis is an dwhat type of whisky you like. If your going for a good combination these two thing must match - otherwise go with one of your favourite malts - simple as that.

The best combination I've tasted was with Highland Park 12 (haggis, mushroom and HP12-sauce and of course a glass of HP12)
SpiritofShetland
Silver Member
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2004 3:32 pm
Location: Trondheim, Norway

Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Dec 27, 2005 4:08 pm

Be sure that's HP12 sauce, and not HP sauce....
Deactivated Member
 

Whic whisky I like?

Postby Mickeman » Tue Dec 27, 2005 7:46 pm

I like all kinds of whisky from light to heavy from simple to complex.

It all depends on the season, occasion and my mood.

Many people seem to like Talisker 10 to their haggis.
Mickeman
New member
 
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 11:44 am

Re: Which is the best singe malt to combine with haggis?

Postby patrick dicaprio » Wed Dec 28, 2005 1:41 pm

Mickeman wrote:Which is the best singe malt to combine with haggis?


I have only tested Glenmorangie 10 which was ok to the haggis.

I imagine that a typical Islay whisky is too pungent?

I would like a dram that doesn't overpower the aroma and taste of the haggis but rather makes combinations that increase the enjoyment of both the whisky and the haggis.


my wife when visiting scotland in her youth bought a stuffed "haggis" which is a little oval shaped stuffed animal with horns. for some reason this amuses me.

on a related note does anyone here like haggis? i have only tried it once at it tasted like liver to me or maybe a different textured pate. i didnt care for it. of course as an Italian, my grandmother used to eat goat heads, eyes and all :shock:

Pat
patrick dicaprio
Silver Member
 
Posts: 298
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2005 3:22 am

Postby hpulley » Wed Dec 28, 2005 2:46 pm

I love haggis! Perhaps the ones here are spiced enough to cover up the hearty smell but to me it is just a wonderful, great big sausage. For most sausages you don't know the contents; in this case you do but so what? It tastes great.

Some years I buy half a dozen to keep in the freezer. I'd like to make my own but my wife won't let me boil the concoction in the house and the propane BBQ doesn't run well in winter! Time for a natural gas hookup I guess. At least my wife allows me to steam the frozen haggis in the house... though she won't eat it.

As I said in another thread, I too find Talisker to be a good haggis dram but I prefer cask strength.

Harry
hpulley
Triple Gold Member
 
Posts: 2503
Joined: Mon Mar 25, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:25 pm

A well made haggis is like nothing else. A wonderfully hearty (sorry about the pun :oops:) peasant dish made traditionally with whatever was left lying around. A bit like Irish stew, Lancashire hotpot, Cornish pasty, pizza and no doubt a host of other dishes the world over.

Like most dishes such as these, they were designed to be portable for the men working in the fields. So where neeps and tatties fell into the equation is beyond me. Needless to say, however, the combination is sublime and I would commend the haggis to anyone.

There is one thing to be insisted upon, however. NEVER put your dram over the haggis. It is a complete waste of haggis and whisky. It's not acceptable to pour a glass of fine red wine over a steak, so why should this barbaric practice occur with the haggis?
Deactivated Member
 

Postby Iain » Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:46 pm

Hear hear Crieftan!
Iain
Double Gold Member
 
Posts: 1254
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2001 2:01 am
Location: Glasgow, Scotland

Postby hpulley » Wed Dec 28, 2005 11:00 pm

I too have my haggis dram beside the haggis, not on the haggis. I've tried some dribbled on and it isn't bad but doesn't seem to be what it was meant for. I do very little cooking with whisky, mostly eating with it.

Now wine... I'll pour a bottle of wine into a sauce without blinking :D

Harry
hpulley
Triple Gold Member
 
Posts: 2503
Joined: Mon Mar 25, 2002 2:01 am
Location: Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Postby Lawrence » Thu Dec 29, 2005 2:35 am

Actually, I've been quite happy to have a good blend with haggis in the past, the grain contribution seesm to help with the haggis flavours.

Malt or blend or haggis or all three, it's all fun.
Lawrence
Matured cask
 
Posts: 5019
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 1:01 am
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada

Return to Questions & Answers

Whisky gift and present finder