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Whiskies with most "wood" in the taste?

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Whiskies with most "wood" in the taste?

Postby thehighking » Sat Jan 07, 2006 5:55 am

Which whiskies do you think have the most wood in them?
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Jan 07, 2006 2:59 pm

Obviously, the older, the more likely. I had a G&M Cask Bruichladdich that was very woody, which I'm sure would count as a bad thing to many, but I quite liked it. Not sure it was recognizable as Bruichladdich, though. I think it was about 29 years old (I'm not in reach of the inventory at the moment).

Most wood in a fairly standard distillery OB, 10-18yo? There's a question.
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Postby WestVanDave » Sat Jan 07, 2006 5:48 pm

The Auchentoshan Three Wood - given its triple distillation lightness and the influence of the multi-woods has a dry, woody astringency that is quite unique. I've appreciated its uniqueness - but don't know if it would be what you are looking for in the way of "most wood in them"...

And to agree with Mr. T - the older bottlings would tend to increase the wood influence. I have had some 30+ year old SMWS bottlings (at very high ABV's) that have that mouth-gripping woodiness and puckering quality.
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Postby thehighking » Sat Jan 07, 2006 9:55 pm

MrTattieHeid wrote:Most wood in a fairly standard distillery OB, 10-18yo? There's a question.


Yes...I should have been a bit more specific in my original question.

This is precisely the question I'm asking. Obviously, most whiskies, with age, tend to acquire more wood taste (although I've had some older Lowlanders where this wasn't the case), but I'm wondering if there are any Scotches that you would characterize as particularly "woody."

I am a relative novice at this whole Scotch thing, but I have noticed that I tend to really enjoyed "wood" in whisky...only when it is present with other elements, obviously.

For instance, I recently had a Highland Park 18, and while it was a *spectacular* whisky, my one thought seemed to be, "Why isn't there more wood with this 18 year old?" (*ducks from HP lovers*)

*shrugs*
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Postby Aidan » Sun Jan 08, 2006 9:36 pm

I think bourbons have a very woody taste as they are matured in virgin oak.
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Postby MGillespie » Mon Jan 09, 2006 2:37 am

I agree with Aidan...never had a Scotch that tasted as woody as any bourbon does...

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Postby bamber » Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:27 am

Amrut of India. Three years old and tastes 20 (apparently) all I can say is it tastes good.
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Postby Crispy Critter » Fri Jan 13, 2006 5:47 am

The new casks that are used for bourbon tend to translate into a spiciness that I don't often find in Scotches. Even then, sometimes that spiciness comes from rye in the mash; the high-rye-content Old Grand-Dad 114, for instance, has an intensely hot cinnamon note to it. Yet Old Rip Van Winkle 15/107, a wheated bourbon, was also quite spicy to me.

Even so, wood can crop up in Scotch as well, in a different way. Ardbeg 1977, for instance, combines its peat with an oak forest. :) It isn't spicy the way that bourbons can be, but IMO, the result is magnificent.

Most of the spice/vanilla notes from bourbons come from the "red layer" where the charcoal and unburnt wood meet. The woodiness that I find in, for instance, the A'77, most likely comes from tannins.
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Most wood? Worst headache?

Postby Muskrat Portage » Fri Jan 13, 2006 8:10 pm

I don't know if this will count as most wood, but it might for worst reaction to wood. I bought and purchased a 12 yo The Glenlivet French Limousin Oak Cask on March 5, 2004. I had one small drink and almost immediately came down with the worst headache I've had in years. I haven't visited that bottle since and no-one else will risk it. Possibly Tannins? M.P.
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Postby Crispy Critter » Sat Jan 14, 2006 7:23 am

It could be some type of sensitivity, to the tannins or to something else. The only whisky that has given me a headache was a Whisky Galore bottling of Glen Garioch (15yo, if I remember right). Lovely on the nose, lovely to the palate, but it it gave me a headache every time I drank it.
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Re: Most wood? Worst headache?

Postby jimidrammer » Sat Jan 14, 2006 3:34 pm

Muskrat Portage wrote:I don't know if this will count as most wood, but it might for worst reaction to wood. I bought and purchased a 12 yo The Glenlivet French Limousin Oak Cask on March 5, 2004. I had one small drink and almost immediately came down with the worst headache I've had in years. I haven't visited that bottle since and no-one else will risk it. Possibly Tannins? M.P.


I tried a bottle of the 12 yo The Glenlivet French Limousin Oak Cask last year and the "new oak" is very prominent, but no adverse reactions here. It was a distinct malt, but barely average, IMHO. I wonder if the Glenmorangie 15 that is finished in new oak barrels has that effect, or is it the Glenmorangie 18yo? I'm not sure which.
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Re: Most wood? Worst headache?

Postby patrick dicaprio » Sat Jan 14, 2006 5:40 pm

Muskrat Portage wrote:I don't know if this will count as most wood, but it might for worst reaction to wood. I bought and purchased a 12 yo The Glenlivet French Limousin Oak Cask on March 5, 2004. I had one small drink and almost immediately came down with the worst headache I've had in years. I haven't visited that bottle since and no-one else will risk it. Possibly Tannins? M.P.


looking at your signature, might this whisky be an exception??

Pat
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Most wood - worst headache?

Postby Muskrat Portage » Sat Jan 14, 2006 6:57 pm

Patrick: "Busted!"
Yes, I 've been considering changing the signature to "In Vino Veritais" but that would probably cause a storm of comments. So, okay, I've met one whisky I don't like, but am willing to give it a second try- the action of oxygen may've improved it. Interested? Muskrat
Okay, it's 1945 hrs here and I've let the Glenlivet (French Limosin Oak) sit out for a while, then inhaled and tasted it. No adverse effects! Hmph!
Nose: Slight fragrance, hint of fruit and possibly wood hints.
Palate: Initial sweetness (tip of tongue) again a hint of wood. After 3rd sip, hint of bitterness on tongue near back. No heat
Finish: short finish, longest on tip of tougue. Again bitterness that fades.
Comment: Not a great malt, but tolerable. No greatly discernable wood taste except for bitterness in finish. I guess there is no such thing as a bad single malt. (Whew!) Possibly sitting around for almost two years after opening has improved it somewhat.
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