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FINE TASTING BOURBON

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FINE TASTING BOURBON

Postby MOLYDENUM1 » Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:56 pm

HELLO EVERYONE, I'M AFTER A NICE TASTING BOURBON AROUND THE $40-£60 PRICE BRACKET, I TREAT MYSELF TO A BOTTLE OF WHISKY EVERY MONTH AND NOW ITS BOUBONS TURN, BY THE WAY I'M FOND OF NOAH'S MILL, IF THAT HELPS.
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Postby richard » Thu Jan 19, 2006 7:29 pm

hi molly have you tried woodfords reserve at sainsburys about £24.00 caramel brown sugar very drinkable

or wild turkey rare breed about 54.2 % i think jim murray said it best for those who like a rare steak at £33.00 at the whisky exchange


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Postby Virginia Gentleman » Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:21 am

You might like the Elijah Craig 12 year old or the Elmer T. Lee Single Barrel. I really like the Wild Turkey Rare Breed but that is barrel proof and might be a bit too strong for you if you are new to bourbon.

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Postby Paul A Jellis » Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:56 am

A 'nice' tasting bourbon? No such thing! It does not exist! Try again . . .

Cheers

Paul
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Postby robs42 » Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:12 am

For £40-£60 I'd plump for either a Blantons (Gold probably) or my favourite, Bookers. On the other hand, although not strictly a bourbon, Van Winkle 13yo Rye is also superb.

Robby
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:37 am

Rowan's Creek is a sibling to Noah's Mill, and perhaps a bit cheaper, but maybe better still taste-wise.
If you have access to W.L. Weller 12yo at its usual general price, you've found one of the great values in bourbon-dom.
Last edited by Deactivated Member on Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Aidan » Fri Jan 20, 2006 7:51 am

From my limited experience, due to poor availability, I have tried and loved the Woodford Reserve and Makers Mark. Just the "standard" ones.

According the Jim Murray, the best whisk(e)y in the world is made in the U.S. and comes from the Buffalo Trace Distillery (I think he said this anyway).
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Postby bamber » Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:50 pm

From thewhiskyexchange.com

All fantastic whiskies, that must be tried IMO:

* Wild Turkey Russell Reserve 101 proof * - get this

Weller antique 7yo - intense and my current favourite pour.

Wild Turkey 12yo - All time great
Weller 12yo - best value for money
Old Charter Proprietors Reserve 13yo
Old Grandad - 114 - Powerful rye flavoured bourbon
Buffalo Trace - The world's greatest distillery's standard bottling

Why not splash out, and get a bottle of George T. Stagg :D
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Postby MGillespie » Sat Jan 21, 2006 2:42 am

These are good choices...I would also recommend Bulleit Frontier Bourbon...had a great interview with Tom Bulleit today that will be up on WhiskyCast soon...the flavor is a little stronger than many bourbons because it has a slightly higher rye content, but it's still very smooth.

Mark
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Postby Frodo » Sat Jan 21, 2006 6:56 am

TNbourbon wrote:Rowan's Creek is a sibling to Noah's Mill, and perhaps a bit cheaper, but maybe better still taste-wise.
If you have access to W.L. Weller 12yo at its usual general price, you've found one of the great values in bourbon-dom.


Wow! I had Rowan's Creek a while ago. If it's anything like Noah's Mill, you're in for a treat!
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Postby MOLYDENUM1 » Sat Jan 21, 2006 6:05 pm

Thanks guys, i've been and purchased a bottle of rowan's creek, it is nice but not quite as nice as noah's mill, just my opinion. i was going to get the old rip van winkle 15 but none in stock so i put in an order for some, i've heard its very nice what do you guys think of it.
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Postby bamber » Sun Jan 22, 2006 12:41 am

It's a good bourbon but not one of my favourites. Most bourbon fans love it though.

Personally I much prefer Noah's Mill to Rowan's Creek so you're not alone there.
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Postby ianbanks » Sun Jan 22, 2006 3:34 pm

Paul A Jellis wrote:A 'nice' tasting bourbon? No such thing! It does not exist! Try again . . .

Cheers

Paul


Yawn.
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Thu Mar 02, 2006 2:08 pm

I've finally decided to buy a bottle of whiskey. I've tried Maker's Mark and a (very) few others like the Edgefield distillery hogsheat. I don't quite know what to look for but I've given myself the choice between two siblings the Noah's Mill or Rowans Creek. Does anyone know the difference between them?

Added later: I also visited the Kentucky Distillers website and it doesn't say anything about the difference of both the "smallbatch products" . Is it the age only that sets them apart?

I also wondered why would you use a column still before the distillate is put into a conventional pot still? To what possible benefit?

Christian
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Postby Photon » Thu Mar 02, 2006 10:46 pm

Christian,

Where did you try Edgefield's Hogshead Whiskey? I thought that was only available locally.

-P.
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Thu Mar 02, 2006 11:10 pm

Photon wrote:Christian,

Where did you try Edgefield's Hogshead Whiskey? I thought that was only available locally.

-P.

Hi Photon!
I tried it right here in Norway :D A friend of mine had visitors from home (he's american) and he asked if they could bring a bottle. I think they live or used to live in Oregon. Anyway, they brought a bottle and I was lucky enough to taste it. Really special stuff - and very good too!

Christian
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Mar 03, 2006 12:28 am

Mr Fjeld wrote:...I also wondered why would you use a column still before the distillate is put into a conventional pot still? To what possible benefit?

Christian


It's a bit of marketing subterfuge. There is not a separate pot still in which to 'put' the distillate -- the 'pot still' they're talking about in every case (including the old Michter's, PA whiskey from which the Hirsch bottlings come) is actually the copper-pot, so-called 'doubler' which actually is built into, but near the top of, the column still.
Only Woodford Reserve uses actual pot stills, a series of three of them -- and its distillate is almost undrinkable by itself, in my opinion (outside of the whiskey press, the recent 4-grain release was almost universally panned). They blend in only a small portion of pot-still distillate (and only since Fall 2003, when the first batches came of age) into 'honey barrels' culled from Brown-Forman's Louisville warehouses to make the standard Woodford Reserve. The first several years of Woodford Reserve product came ENTIRELY from barrels culled elsewhere, but moved to the former Labrot & Graham Distillery's warehouses to complete aging.
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Postby Badmonkey » Fri Mar 03, 2006 5:35 am

I finally spotted Eagle Rare (Single Barrel?) in Calgary last weekend, which would mark the first commercial inroads by Buffalo Trace into Alberta. I hope this is a sign of things to come, because every sample I tasted from that distillery has been dynamite. If you can get your paws on any of their offerings you'll be in for a treat, Molly.
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:57 am

TNbourbon wrote:
Mr Fjeld wrote:...I also wondered why would you use a column still before the distillate is put into a conventional pot still? To what possible benefit?

Christian


It's a bit of marketing subterfuge. There is not a separate pot still in which to 'put' the distillate -- the 'pot still' they're talking about in every case (including the old Michter's, PA whiskey from which the Hirsch bottlings come) is actually the copper-pot, so-called 'doubler' which actually is built into, but near the top of, the column still.
Only Woodford Reserve uses actual pot stills, a series of three of them -- and its distillate is almost undrinkable by itself, in my opinion (outside of the whiskey press, the recent 4-grain release was almost universally panned). They blend in only a small portion of pot-still distillate (and only since Fall 2003, when the first batches came of age) into 'honey barrels' culled from Brown-Forman's Louisville warehouses to make the standard Woodford Reserve. The first several years of Woodford Reserve product came ENTIRELY from barrels culled elsewhere, but moved to the former Labrot & Graham Distillery's warehouses to complete aging.

Thanks for the answer TNbourbon! So there isn't a single distillery making whiskey the way we are used to in a conventional scottish distillery? Not even Anchor Distillery uses a traditional still? Sorry for asking all those questions but I simply haven't got a clue about anything but scothch and perhaps it's time to learn about other quality whiskies too.

Christian
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Fri Mar 03, 2006 9:06 pm

It looks like I can answer my original question myself as I mailed the distiller. Here is a quote from the answer by Even Kulsveen:

They are many differences between the two other than the obvious age and abv (grains, mash bill, yeast strains, length of fermentation, fermentation pH, fermentation alcohol, high & low wine cuts, storage location, barrel entry proof, barrel char level, chill & filtration aspects, and much, much more) all of which is very technical and secretive information.


Looks like they don't have much in common then?

Christian
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Mar 03, 2006 11:47 pm

Mr Fjeld wrote:...So there isn't a single distillery making whiskey the way we are used to in a conventional scottish distillery? Not even Anchor Distillery uses a traditional still?..

Christian

No, and yes -- I believe Mr. Maytag does, indeed, use a copper pot for Old Potrero, but he uses a non-traditional (which only HE claims is the TRUE traditional) rye recipe of 100% malted rye. Virtually every other maker of American straight rye uses close to the minimum 51% rye, 35% or so corn and remainder malted barley.
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:31 am

TNbourbon wrote:
Mr Fjeld wrote:...So there isn't a single distillery making whiskey the way we are used to in a conventional scottish distillery? Not even Anchor Distillery uses a traditional still?..

Christian

No, and yes -- I believe Mr. Maytag does, indeed, use a copper pot for Old Potrero, but he uses a non-traditional (which only HE claims is the TRUE traditional) rye recipe of 100% malted rye. Virtually every other maker of American straight rye uses close to the minimum 51% rye, 35% or so corn and remainder malted barley.

Thanks for your response Tim. I think I'm going to get the Old Potrero from Sweden this summer but I'll definately buy the Noah's Mill in the nearest future. The shopping list for the summer vacation in Sweden is getting out of hand.......

Christian
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Postby bjorn » Mon Mar 06, 2006 6:44 am

TNbourbon wrote:It's a bit of marketing subterfuge. There is not a separate pot still in which to 'put' the distillate -- the 'pot still' they're talking about in every case (including the old Michter's, PA whiskey from which the Hirsch bottlings come) is actually the copper-pot, so-called 'doubler' which actually is built into, but near the top of, the column still.


not even the Hirsch bottlings? I have to admit I'm a little shattered...I thought that was pure pot still bourbon...not that I've tried it, but i may now think twice about buying it

-bjorn
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Mar 06, 2006 11:50 pm

bjorn wrote:
TNbourbon wrote:It's a bit of marketing subterfuge. There is not a separate pot still in which to 'put' the distillate -- the 'pot still' they're talking about in every case (including the old Michter's, PA whiskey from which the Hirsch bottlings come) is actually the copper-pot, so-called 'doubler' which actually is built into, but near the top of, the column still.


not even the Hirsch bottlings? I have to admit I'm a little shattered...I thought that was pure pot still bourbon...not that I've tried it, but i may now think twice about buying it

-bjorn


Indeed, even the Hirsch from Michter's is a standard (albeit, a very HIGH standard) column-still product. You can see a picture of the still operator and still at this website (note the sign attached to the still labeling it as "Pot Still Doubler #1", which is clearly shaped and configured as an element in a larger column -- this is standard at nearly all of Kentucky's stills today outside of Woodford Reserve's true pots):
http://web.tampabay.rr.com/ybfowler/legacy.htm

Michter's did purchase and operate a true copper pot still as a U.S. Bicentennial project in 1976, which produced about a barrel a day which was then sold from the Michter's Jug House, the on-site gift shop. But it never produced pot-still whiskey in great quantity. That still, by the way, is owned by David Beam -- a descendant of Pennco/Michter's master distiller C. Everett Beam -- and is located in a garage behind his Old Kentucky Home hotel in Bardstown, KY. He operates it (distilling water, of course) during the Kentucky Bourbon Festival each September. I provided the family with a bottle of the Hirsch 20yo last fall, which would have been distilled during Everett Beam's 40-year tenure there.
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Tue Mar 07, 2006 12:04 am

I hope it's alright if I bother you with one last question Tim. Do you recommend special glasses for making the most out of bourbons? I was wondering if the strong character of bourbon requires other types of glassware than say the Glencairns?

Cheers

Christian
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Mar 07, 2006 2:00 am

I know many bourbon aficianados who enjoy their favorite pour regularly in Glencairns -- I use one occasionally myself, and find it a fine glass for bourbon.
My favorites are the Riedel "O"-series for Riesling/Sauvignon Blanc, which are the same shape but a bit larger than the "O" Spirits/Fortified Wine glasses. I also have a set of Riedel Ouverture Bourbon glasses, which are superior for nosing.
The most important thing, to me, in any bourbon glass -- and I've often used common brandy snifters, too -- is the tulip shape, tapering in to the rim, to focus aromas.
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Tue Mar 07, 2006 6:47 am

TNbourbon wrote:I know many bourbon aficianados who enjoy their favorite pour regularly in Glencairns -- I use one occasionally myself, and find it a fine glass for bourbon.
My favorites are the Riedel "O"-series for Riesling/Sauvignon Blanc, which are the same shape but a bit larger than the "O" Spirits/Fortified Wine glasses. I also have a set of Riedel Ouverture Bourbon glasses, which are superior for nosing.
The most important thing, to me, in any bourbon glass -- and I've often used common brandy snifters, too -- is the tulip shape, tapering in to the rim, to focus aromas.

Thanks for your help Tim - I'm looking forward to Friday :)
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My favourites

Postby rymon » Tue Mar 14, 2006 9:03 pm

I ALWAYS have a bottle of Wild Turkey Russels Reserve on hand... a truly remarkable whisky, especially considering the $$.

Second would be Woodford's Reserve. The maple brown sugar flavour is uniquely brilliant.

Give them a try!
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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Tue Mar 14, 2006 9:18 pm

I love Makers Mark red seal with it's rich christmas cake mix fruitiness, also have the black seal but found it slightly too woody for me??? Have Woodford Reserve which I find ok but William Larue Weller 60.95% is sublime and I can easily sip it straight, a contender for my top bourbon along with MM red seal. I also have a George T Stagg which is also a good bourbon but the fact I have to put a good dash of water in it and the fact it is the only whiskey that gives me a hangover :cry: (or is it the fact I'm drinking too much of it :wink: ) it loses some bonus points.
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Re: FINE TASTING BOURBON

Postby patrick dicaprio » Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:43 pm

MOLYDENUM1 wrote:HELLO EVERYONE, I'M AFTER A NICE TASTING BOURBON AROUND THE $40-£60 PRICE BRACKET, I TREAT MYSELF TO A BOTTLE OF WHISKY EVERY MONTH AND NOW ITS BOUBONS TURN, BY THE WAY I'M FOND OF NOAH'S MILL, IF THAT HELPS.


on others recommendations here i tried the woodford reserve and the elijah craig 12. both were excellent. the Elijah craig might be the best value of any whisky i have ever purchased, as the bottle was only $15 US. i would get both, in some places where i live you can get both for a total under $45US.

Pat
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go for the rare breed

Postby elli » Sat Apr 08, 2006 10:39 pm

the Rare Breed wild turkey is a beauty, it has a vanilla, chocolatey nose a smooth taste that has great power, I call it a tomahawk cruise missile in a bottle, wow
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