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End of the glass tumbler?

General chat and talk about whisky.

Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Mar 14, 2006 7:35 pm

Yet another sad example of the minority spoiling it for everyone else :evil:
What next - whisky in fizzy drink style bottles???? :shock:
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Tue Mar 14, 2006 9:37 pm

Ordinary plastic cups are shite - having said that though I guess it's safety first. I don't know how big a problem this is in Glasgow but if it's rather common to be hit in the face with a broken bottle or a glass then I would applaud such a ban. If it's possible to use Glencairn glasses I would say it's only a good thing :wink:

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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Tue Mar 14, 2006 10:52 pm

Damn, Damn, Damn I say ... what a tragedy. I'm off to Glasgow in 2 week-ends time. What prey tell will happen to all my whiskey tasting. This is a disaster. I am actually quite depressed by the whole thing now :evil:
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Postby Mr Ellen » Tue Mar 14, 2006 11:17 pm

I don't think you need to worry:

"The ban applies to all goods sold in glass containers from more than 100 premises which sell hot food after 2300GMT in the city."

"The proposals do not affect restaurants or premises without takeaway facilities"

As Pot Stil, Uisge Beatha, Ben Nevis or most whisky bars don't fall into the above mentioned category it means you can still have your dram in a glass suited for the drink.

Happy now.... :D :D :D

Cheers.....
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Lack of positive reinforcement perhaps?

Postby Muskrat Portage » Wed Mar 15, 2006 1:37 am

C_I:
I've excerpted these from the first BBC website:
"Professor Jonathan Shepherd, a face surgeon, said the introduction of a blanket ban in the city was "terrific"...Mr Shepherd is professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery at Cardiff University. ...Prof Shepherd is also chairman of Cardiff's violence prevention group." from: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/4802238.stm

The good Professor appears to be in what we would refer to as a slight conflict of interest position, being both an oral surgeon and strongly involved in anti-violence. Not what could be considered unbiased. We had a similar knee jerk reaction to smoking over here, resulting in most establishments going smoke free. I wonder how many of these types of assault have occured in Glasgow? Are we dealing with isolated instances, or is it fairly widespread? Otherwise, this decision appears to be an over reaction to possibly a shortage of effective control of the areas of concern (read erosion of police services).

Regretfully, until the courts see fit to sanction severe physical assault, like those caused with broken glass or bottles, with more than a mere slap on the perpetrators' fingers, we will continue to have our privileges eroded by well-meaning but over zealous pressure groups. The efforts of the Glaswegian constabulary are only as good as the support they are given by the public and core public institutions.

(Sorry for the diatribe, I was a Supreme & District Court Registrar and it raises my ire when I perceive the erosion of public order and services. AND I'm damned if I'll drink out of plastic glasses!)
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Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:06 am

Musky, you make good points on the whole, but it's hard to fault the doctor's advocacy of a glass ban as a conflict of interest. Now, if a maxillofacial surgeon advocated more glass, as a means of drumming up business, you'd have a point.

As Mr Ellen noted, this so-called ban is somewhat limited in scope, and I really doubt that discerning malt drinkers have much to worry about. These things get a bit distorted in the press, causing all sorts of responses along the lines of "the sky is falling". I am reminded of the infamous case of the too-hot McDonald's coffee, which was actually a matter of a careless drive-through attendant dropping a cup of joe in someone's lap.
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Postby Aidan » Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:16 am

Sticking broken glasses in people's faces is a part of the Glasgow culture that should be preserved at all cost. This is going to take a bit of pizazz out of the Old Firm encounters.
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Postby kallaskander » Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:48 am

Hi there,

face injuries by broken glass from glasses or bottles are a severe and traumatic experience if one should be the victim of such an attack. There is no doubt about that. Besides that banning glass bottles has been forgotten being run over by a car in the city of Glasgow is a severe and traumatic experience, too. So what is the logical consequence of the fact that in Glasgow people are run over by cars? Exactly.
Being mugged or robbed is traumatic, too. I think there should be a ban on muggings and robberies in Glasgow to prevent further violence.

Greetings
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Postby Iain » Wed Mar 15, 2006 10:04 am

Not just Glasgow, Aidan - Edinburgh too.

http://edinburghnews.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=9792006

I'm struggling to understand this, and agree there must surely be some press exaggeration here re the extent of the ban. I know a pint glass or a bottle can be and all-too-often is used as a weapon (not just in Scotland), but a whisky glass doesn't seem very useful to someone hell-bent on disfiguring someone else: if you break and brandish a broken whisky glass, you're more likely to cut your hand than someone's face, surely! Maybe one of the big chunky ones could serve as a dangerous missile, but not the cheap, lightweight ones that are provided in most Scottish pubs.


I wait with interest for the next move to prevent violent assaults in public places - perhaps by banning pool cues from pool halls :D .
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Postby parvus » Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:23 am

kallaskander wrote:Hi there,
...being run over by a car in the city of Glasgow is a severe and traumatic experience, too. So what is the logical consequence of the fact that in Glasgow people are run over by cars? Exactly.
Being mugged or robbed is traumatic, too. I think there should be a ban on muggings and robberies in Glasgow to prevent further violence.


I think they should ban strawman arguments while they're on a roll :wink:

I'd rather they banned the glassware than go down the road the americans went with prohibition. It is just one of those unfortunate things where the few decide the rules for the many. These sorts of people should be avoided, and possibly sent to Australia.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 15, 2006 5:07 pm

parvus wrote:These sorts of people should be avoided, and possibly sent to Australia.


They tried that already, and look what it led to!
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Postby Matt2 » Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:34 am

What is this country coming too? Still doesn't stop the yobs drinking their alco-pops from glass bottles and smashing them all over the place. Not very good news for Whisky Live Glasgow :cry:

What's next? Plastic knives in restaurants, paper plates, ban on carrying keys, cover every hard object in rubber, ban on stilettos....

Why not just lock us all up in a big padded cell and spoon feed us baby food. :twisted:
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Postby The Dazzler » Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:53 am

Guys, this ban needs to be ay least tackled by the consumers and the whisky industry. I don't want to stand back and see our great whisky bars have to sell their fine whiskies in a plastic cup. I also read somewhere that champagne may still be able to be served in a glass flute. What does this say? That yobs do not drink Champagne so thats OK. At a rate of 1.5 glass attacks per week in Glasgow this is sad to see the Pot Still and Lismore etc be affected in this way, I cannot comprehend using a plastic cup for my whisky in the future.

Surely each pub should be ablr to look after its own clientele, If there are safety issues then these establishments should be closed down and licenses taken away. The guys in th whisky bars in Glasgow are trying to lodge a protest which is being met by bully boy threats of having extended openeing hours refused in the future.

If this ban goes through it will cause problems for the industry, image of glasgow and could well be extended throughout the UK. Being glassed in the face would not be a happy incident but in a day and age when a consumer wants to enjoy their drink to the best possible standards and the industry is trying to educate and promote whisky the way they have in the past few years this is a major step in the wrong direction.

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Postby kallaskander » Thu Mar 16, 2006 12:22 pm

Hi there,

well spoken. When champagne is further sold in flutes what about malts and nosing glasses? As far as I followed the discussiun the fuss is about heavy tumblers. Glass is glass when it comes to use it as a weapon. When we talk about the connoisseurs enjoyment I would prefer a nosing glass. The tumbler may be the bar tradition but if the alternative is plastic? Is that a possible backdoor?
Would we want to hang on to tumblers anyway? :(

Greetings
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Postby Sherried Malt » Sun Mar 19, 2006 1:12 pm

Matt Page wrote:What's next? Plastic knives in restaurants, paper plates, ban on carrying keys, cover every hard object in rubber, ban on stilettos....


We should do all these things. They make a lot of sense to me. However, you forgot to mention coating the edges of paper with rubber to prevent those nasty paper cuts. :wink:

One thing tho. If you start messing with stilettos, then you and I have a SERIOUS problem! :D :D
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:19 am

Stilettos cripple more people than bar glasses.
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Postby Paul A Jellis » Thu Mar 23, 2006 5:55 pm

It's just what this planet needs - more b****y plastic!!!!!

Paul
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Glass go

Postby Muskrat Portage » Fri Jun 09, 2006 10:09 pm

IMHO
This ban is a concern to future tourist revenues. I would not choose to go to any establishment that was serving fine beverages of any sort in plastic glasses. Especially not at some of the prices that can be demanded. A negative picture of the city of Glasgow is being presented by the very people who are charged with selling it to future visitors.

Perhaps there should be an exemption introduced that would require an owner to apply for, based on several factors, for example; location, staff training and use of higher cost vessels that are strictly policed to remain inside the establishment (champagne flutes; Glencairn tasting glasses etc).

This "glass go" ban certainly smacks of a "knee jerk" reaction to insufficient controls being maintained by both publicans and those who are supposed to provide effective civil protection. Is the next step insisting on the use of tetra packs for the beverages themselves, being as the vessels are glass as well?

When you allow government to legislate your leisure time, you lose personal control. (Case in point -Canada's draconian smoking laws)
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Postby TheLiquorBaron » Fri Jun 09, 2006 10:52 pm

My only comment on this legislation is....
HOW BLOODY RIDICULOUS!!
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Re: Glass go

Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Jun 10, 2006 4:02 am

Muskrat Portage wrote:When you allow government to legislate your leisure time, you lose personal control. (Case in point -Canada's draconian smoking laws)
M. Pete


Which draconian smoking laws are those, Pete? The ones that are in line with what every other country is doing?

Sorry, you touch a nerve. When you can smoke next to me without making me gag, then we can talk about easing smoking restrictions. As much as smokers would like to frame it otherwise, these restrictions have nothing to do with limiting personal freedom, and everything to do with regulating inherently obnoxious behavior (which incidentally infringes on the personal freedom of others). One of my great peeves is people who have no clue how much what they do affects others, and smokers are exhibit A.

Off my soapbox. Have a nice day! 8)
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Postby TheLiquorBaron » Sat Jun 10, 2006 5:05 am

and everything to do with regulating inherently obnoxious behavior

More peoples Health!

people who have no clue how much what they do affects others, and smokers are exhibit A.

I can agree to this to some extent...there are some smokers that have no regard for other's Health & Well Being, However I would like to point out that there are a growing number of smokers who do regard other's health and their choice to be in a smoke free enviroment. I myself make a point of moving to an area away from non-smokers!
I also used to enjoy lighting a cigarette after a meal BUT I would wait until all people at the table had finished their meals - I used to HATE when people would light up while others or myself were still eating!!
I know that this courteousy is not shared by all smokers, yet I can safely say that their are smokers who do care about other's health!
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Postby Iain » Sat Jun 10, 2006 8:57 am

Re "glass go" - it's not quite the blanket ban that folks are complaining about - at least, not yet! There are some exemptions in the city:

http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5053229.html

Re smoking - that ban has been enforced in bars across Scotland for a whiles now, and most folks seem happy (or at least comfortable) with it.
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Re: Glass go: smoke and mirrors?

Postby Muskrat Portage » Sat Jun 10, 2006 4:20 pm

MrTattieHeid wrote:
Muskrat Portage wrote: (Case in point -Canada's draconian smoking laws)M. Pete
Which draconian smoking laws are those, Pete? The ones that are in line with what every other country is doing? 8)

Bruce: (Sorry if I touched a nerve there, I too am an avowed non smoker but I despise inept Government meddling. I don't like walking through a cloud of smoke every time I walk into a building so applaud the 9 m away from any door rule. What is draconian is that you cannot have a roof over a designated smoking area and it can only have two walls... you can smoke on a patio that has umbrellas at the tables, until it rains, then the umbrella becomes a roof and you can't smoke under it. :shock: The fine; $5,000.00 per infraction for the smoker and a further $5,000.00 for the company, business, private club or corporation the infraction occurs at. Hotels are exempt and can have a designated smoking room yet the legislation was to have no exemptions.)
Iain: I'm pleased to hear some venues have been granted exemptions as this will give added impetus to those challenging an outright ban, as a legal precedent has been set outside the blanket ban. M.P.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sun Jun 11, 2006 9:40 am

I have a real problem with local councillors as a whole.
The calibre of the average Scottish councillor is staggering - small minded, tin pot dictators with little else to do but interfere with the good working people going about their business, contributing to society. They are scared to tackle the real issues and instead try to repair the leaking dam with sticky tape always on the look out for a way to feather their own nest. The very fact that these people want to be councillors should be a bar to them ever getting elected.

The simple answer for the good folk of Glasgow is to record their displeasure by voting them out at the next election. This, however, just means that another bunch of unemployable layabouts and retired bores who have been put out to grass will come forward :evil: The answer, abolish local councils. Scotland is a small enough country to only need one power base - the Parliament. For goodness sake, one council in England probably has more of a population than our entire country! We don't need 32 seperate councils all doing different things and wasting public money. :evil: :evil:

My concern for Glasgow is that events like Whisky Live may consider pulling out and moving elsewhere. Actually it would do no harm to get away from the central belt. Edinburgh has Whisky Fringe, Glasgow has Whisky Live, there are the festivals in Speyside and Islay - What about the rest of Scotland? The obvious choice for a festival would be Perth :D

Since I'm still recovering from a rare night out in Falkirk, I have to pick up on the smoking ban. This has been the best thing ever. Whilst I may have woken up with a mouth like a badger's bum, I did not have a sore throat, my room did not stink of smoke and my clothes did not reak of kippers. Wonderful - absolutely wonderful.

Toodle pip :wink:
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Postby Iain » Sun Jun 11, 2006 7:27 pm

I'll second that. The indoor smoking ban has been one of the best things to happen here for many years. Time to extend it to beer gardens!
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Postby Iain » Thu Jun 15, 2006 6:13 pm

Latest from Glasgow's Evening Times...

http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5053644.html
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Postby Deactivated Member » Thu Jun 15, 2006 7:30 pm

We can only hope that good sense prevails :roll:
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Postby Paul A Jellis » Thu Jun 15, 2006 11:31 pm

Below is the email address for George Black, the Chief Executive of Glasgow City Council, it was on the Council's own website. I suggest that everybody concerned about the glass ban sends an email to him to voice that concern, it has made me think twice about visiting Glasgow again.

You never know - it could make a difference!

george.black@ced.glasgow.gov.uk
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Jun 16, 2006 9:04 am

If they ban glasses in pubs, then they should ban them in restaurants and cafeterias too. Then the people advocating the ban might realise what they are trying to impose on others.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Jun 19, 2006 5:14 pm

Good news!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/glasgow_and_west/5095956.stm

Common sense prevails, for once.
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Postby SpiritofShetland » Wed Jun 21, 2006 8:14 am

That's good news. Means I don't have to always carry a glass with me when visiting Glasgow.

But I see that councillor Macdiarmid is still trying to salvage something for his own glory claiming it's due to the licensing board 's "listening role" that the change has come. This is the same guy that earlier said that the matter is made up and no change will be made, period.

The only thing the good councillor listened to was the noise from the courtroom after the SBPA started going through legal channels.

Everybody knows th bad that's in effect work - since there haven't been any (AFAIK) glassrelated attack since the ban when into effect for nightclubs and such. But that also proved that a ban on glasses in pubs are not needed.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:38 am

This is good news, but even though I don't visit Glasgow too often, I was fearing the worst and already getting prepared:

Image

Image
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Wed Jun 21, 2006 6:26 pm

I have never ever seen - or heard about - a telescopic whisky glass :lol:

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Postby Virginia Gentleman » Thu Jun 22, 2006 1:15 am

Mr Fjeld wrote:I have never ever seen - or heard about - a telescopic whisky glass :lol:

Christian


They are actually pretty common. I have several of them. If you search on Google or ebay you will find them.
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Thu Jun 22, 2006 12:24 pm

I see, but I haven't heard about it or seen one before - not even in any of the online distillery shops. Anyway, it's a funny and genius little thing.

Christian
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