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What is the smoothest/least fierce Scotch Whisky?

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What is the smoothest/least fierce Scotch Whisky?

Postby johannes » Tue Mar 14, 2006 6:37 pm

Hello,

I wondered what your opinions are on the smoothest scotch.
I would like to know what is the most lightweight scotch as I
don't like anything to powerful or with a lot of rye in the mix.

I've been drinking Maker's Mark for this reason but could you
recommend a Scotch Whisky to move over to.

Thanks,

Johannes
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Mar 14, 2006 7:00 pm

Scapa 14 is about the lightest single malt Scotch I've had lately. I have never had any idea what "smoothness" is.
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Postby johannes » Tue Mar 14, 2006 7:12 pm

Thanks. I suppose when I talk of smoothness I'm thinking of the level of burn, and level of lighter flavours as opposed to coarser flavours.

I recently tried a mature Gordon & McPhail bottling from the Balblair distillery. Upon tasting it had a powerful edge that Maker's Mark does not, due to the Rye. I'm looking for a scotch with some of these smoother qualities, perhaps a lower rye recipe and one which presents more mellow flavours than the coarser varities.

More suggestions greatly appreciated and welcome.

Thanks

Johannes
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Mar 14, 2006 7:30 pm

Burn is usually associated with the level of alcohol. The lowest ABV for Malt, indeed any Scotch whisky, is 40%.
At this level there are many easy drinking malts and blends - not just Scotch either.
Try an Irish - Jamesons perhaps. It's not at all bad and being triple distilled, it is a lighter spirit than some SMWs.
I find the Macphails collection Glenturret 15yo particularly easy to drink.
I'd commend TH's suggestion of Scapa 14 and also push you towards Highland Park 12.
Good luck with your quest :D
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:01 pm

For lightly flavoured scotches I wonder if one can do better than Bruichladdich 10 and Glengoyne 10.

Christian
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Postby Scotty Mc » Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:10 pm

I'm particularly fond of Tomintoul 10yo, it's like a liquer-eske dram. Very tasty!
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Postby Deactivated Member » Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:53 pm

Single malt Scotch is made entirely with barley. The grain whisky in blends may contain other grains, but I don't think rye. I stand to be corrected.
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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Tue Mar 14, 2006 9:27 pm

You should maybe try some Irish Whiskey. If you can get Redbreast 12yo pure pot still you will not be dissapointed. Considered by some of the top whiskey critics as one of the worlds great whiskeys.

Also Dalwhinnie or Glenrothes scotches are nice easy drinking whiskies.

Good luck.
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Postby johannes » Tue Mar 14, 2006 10:46 pm

Hi,

Thanks for all the responses so far.

Am I likely to be looking at a single malt or a blend to achieve what I'm looking for?

I've heard that Chivas Regal 12 is a good blend for smoothness or should this be avoided at all costs?

Thanks.

Johannes
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Postby Mr Ellen » Tue Mar 14, 2006 10:59 pm

I find the following to be without "rough edges" or "smooth":

- Aberlour
- Glengoyne 10y, 17y or 21y.
- Scapa 12y.(discontinued) Scapa 14y. (New distillery bottling)
- Strathisla 12

Of course, there are several others, but these spring to mind instantly.
As for irish, Redbreast 12y. is a wonderful choice.

Cheers
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Postby jimidrammer » Tue Mar 14, 2006 11:02 pm

Teacher's Highland Cream (Blend) is very "smooth" and light with good balanced flavors.

I would agree with Dalwhinnie and Glenrothes. Actually most malts at or above 15yo have a very mild "burn", such as Longmorn 15, Balvenie 15, Lagavulin 16, Highland Park 18, etc.
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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Tue Mar 14, 2006 11:09 pm

Blends are not to be over looked especially if you are looking for a nice light rounded whiskey. Maybe ask your local retailer and if you think they know what they are talking bout then they will probably point you in the right direction. Grain in whiskey is not a bad thing as that is exactly what it can do.... lighten the whiskey but you should stick to the better know brands and though I have not tried Chivas 12 I reckon it is safe bet.

Good luck with what ever you choose.

P.S. if at first you find it a bit overpowering persever and it actually seems less overpowering as you get used to it.
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Postby Paul A Jellis » Wed Mar 15, 2006 1:32 am

A lot of blends aimed at the American market are often lighter and softer, Dewers and Cutty Sark spring to mind.

As for malts, when I fancy something light I'll have a Bruichladdich 10 or Arbelour 10, or play around with the amount of water added, until you get the balance just right for your own taste.

Cheers

Paul
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Re: What is the smoothest/least fierce Scotch Whisky?

Postby Frodo » Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:15 am

johannes wrote:Hello,

I wondered what your opinions are on the smoothest scotch.
I would like to know what is the most lightweight scotch as I
don't like anything to powerful or with a lot of rye in the mix.

I've been drinking Maker's Mark for this reason but could you
recommend a Scotch Whisky to move over to.

Thanks,

Johannes


I'd have said Balvenie 15 watered down to 40%abv. Powers Gold Label does good as well. Perhaps Auchantoshan 10yr, but it is bland!
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Postby MGillespie » Wed Mar 15, 2006 3:10 am

What about the Glenmorangie 10...that's always the first one that comes to mind when I think of a light single malt...

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Postby Lawrence » Wed Mar 15, 2006 3:58 am

How about BenRiach or Tomintoul? Both gentle whiskies........
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Postby Aidan » Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:05 am

When I was in Munich, I went to a brewery called Andex. They had beer there at about 10% abv and it was like drinking lemonade. It was incredably smooth, so I would not say smoothness is always related to alcohol content.

Bunnahabain is quite smooth, I think.

Also, the Tyrconnel is a very smooth whiskey. It is not the most "complex", but it's very enjoyable. Also, Abelour is a good balance between smoothness and flavor.
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Postby Aidan » Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:05 am

Oh, Arran and Glenmorangie too.

... and Bushmills, especially the Blackbush.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:42 am

Aidan wrote:When I was in Munich, I went to a brewery called Andex. They had beer there at about 10% abv and it was like drinking lemonade. It was incredably smooth, so I would not say smoothness is always related to alcohol content.


The Canadian brewer Unibroue makes Belgian-style beers, the strongest of which is called Fin du Monde ("End Of The World"). It goes down really easy. It comes back up kind of rough.
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Postby Aidan » Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:02 am

MrTattieHeid wrote:
Aidan wrote:When I was in Munich, I went to a brewery called Andex. They had beer there at about 10% abv and it was like drinking lemonade. It was incredably smooth, so I would not say smoothness is always related to alcohol content.


The Canadian brewer Unibroue makes Belgian-style beers, the strongest of which is called Fin du Monde ("End Of The World"). It goes down really easy. It comes back up kind of rough.


Yes, that's after the stomach has taken all the best bits!

In this place, a monastery, there were handles on the sinks...
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Postby johannes » Wed Mar 15, 2006 12:11 pm

Thanks again for all the responses so far.

It looks like there are several names that are quite popular for this sort of Scotch. I'm also tempted to look at some of the Irish Whiskys with their triple distillation.

Johannes
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Postby kallaskander » Wed Mar 15, 2006 1:08 pm

Hi there,

try a Benromach 18 or 21 years from the new releases by the new owner Gordon&MacPhail.

Greetings
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Summary of Whisky Connoisseurs opinions....

Postby johannes » Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:10 pm

All the following have been suggested twice:

Scapa 14
Tomintoul 10
Highland Park 12
Glengoyne 10
Glenmorangie 10 or 15
Glenrothes 14
Dalwhinnie 15
Balvenie 10
Aberlour 10
Redbreast 12


Of this selection, I may try and buy two or three. Does anybody have any strong opinions on which I should choose or which will be the most satisfying drink, bearing in mind requirements for 'mellowness'?

Johannes
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Postby Frodo » Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:30 pm

Of these, I don't think 'morangie, Tomintoul, or Abelour make the cut relative to your requirements as they tend to have too much personality. Most whisky drinkers love that in their whisky of course, but that was not what you've identified.

Of these, I'd feel the most strongly about Redbreast, Dalwinnie, and Scapa. Just my take on things.
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Postby Mr Ellen » Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:35 pm

Out of those whiskies I would go for:

Glengoyne 10
Scapa 14
Redbreast 12


These are all, in my opinion, mellow and soft on the tongue but with a variety of tastes. All very good whiskies... :D

Cheers...
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Postby Frodo » Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:41 pm

On second thought, I agree with Glengoyne 10 over Dalwinnie 15. Dalwinnie is silky, but it also has a lot of flavour that may interfere - in the tiniest way - with "mellow".
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Postby Mr Fjeld » Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:48 pm

I still think Bruichladdich 10 together with Glengoyne 10 would match your requirments perfectly .

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Postby bamber » Wed Mar 15, 2006 3:43 pm

In order of 'easy drinkingness':
Glengoyne 10yo - very very smooth and easy drinking
Glenmorangie 10yo
Scapa 14yo
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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Wed Mar 15, 2006 4:30 pm

As a predominant Irish whiskey drinker I'd go for Redbreast 12yo as pick of the crop and Dalwhinnie 15yo and a GlenRothes.

They are all in small dumpy bottles and the glenrothes looks really cool in your drinks cabinet.
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Postby bamber » Wed Mar 15, 2006 4:40 pm

First off. I'd like to say I think Redbreast 12yo is a great whiskey and I got through a bottle of it in a blink of an eye.

Yes it is smooth but it is also extremely distincitve and, to my mind, flavour packed.

I'd rather drink it to my 3 recommendations on almost any given day, but it tastes nothing like Scotch IMO and is a whisky that I've seen people wince at, when first trying it.

IMHO if you want to try one of the world's great and most unique whiskies, the Redbreast is a good choice, but I do not believe it is a gentle introduction to Scotch.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:30 pm

Or an introduction to Scotch at all, in fact.

I think I would also disqualify Glenrothes, a very fine whisky but not what I think you want. Do you drink your whisky straight? If you find anything too firey, you can of course add a few dribs of water. And I think we all hope that you will eventually come to appreciate those drams we think have more character. But to each his own. Enjoy!
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Postby johannes » Wed Mar 15, 2006 7:29 pm

I do tend to drink the Maker's Mark bourbon straight, but the Balblair 10 (G&McP) I add a little water to because it is a little more potent.

I think, to begin with, I might go for a trial of the Glengoyne 10 and then try the Scapa 14 after that. The only problem with Glengoyne 10 is finding it; most of my local retailers do not stock it, so I may have to order online and face the hefty delivery charge! I'm going to keep trying to track it down.
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Postby Aidan » Wed Mar 15, 2006 7:32 pm

I would not say "smooth" whisky has any less character in general to "un-smooth" whisky. A whisky can be smooth and great or rough and great, and everything else in between.
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Postby Frodo » Wed Mar 15, 2006 7:56 pm

Aidan wrote:I would not say "smooth" whisky has any less character in general to "un-smooth" whisky. A whisky can be smooth and great or rough and great, and everything else in between.


Agreed!
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Postby Mr Ellen » Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:24 pm

Sorry for recommending the Redbreast 12. I missed the note that it was Scotch only. :oops:
Anyway, my recommendations for Glengoyne 10y. and Scapa 14y. stands.
As a third I would recommend a lowlander as they tend to be rather smooth and light in style. Perhaps a Glenkinchie or Rosebank would suit your request.

Cheers...
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