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Whisky and Humidity

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Whisky and Humidity

Postby mreitenb » Thu Mar 30, 2006 6:15 am

You probably noticed that whiskys taste different depending on the season and temperature. See http://www.whiskymag.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2862 for a short discussion.

However, I think that RELATIVE HUMIDITY may be a more important variable than outside temperature. For example, whenever I am comparing Ardbeg 10yo against Laphroaig 10yo, Ardbeg wins on dry days, and Laphroaig tastes better on humid days.

So, what whiskys do you like on dry days and which ones do you prefer on humid days? As a general rule, I would say that full-bodied malts (peated or sherried) are good in dry conditions, whereas lighter whiskys (such as Glenlivet, Green Spot) and especially Bourbons are good for humid days. What do people from extreme climates like Arizona (dry) or Florida (humid) have to say?
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Postby Deactivated Member » Thu Mar 30, 2006 8:04 am

I've never thought about that. I daresay very few of us have ever thought about that. Congrats on a novel thought! As someone who thinks all tasting is subjective and situational, I await the response of my fellows, and I will myself think about which particular malt I might enjoy on a damp day or a dry one.
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Re: Whisky and Humidity

Postby Mr Fjeld » Thu Mar 30, 2006 9:05 am

mreitenb wrote:
However, I think that RELATIVE HUMIDITY may be a more important variable than outside temperature. For example, whenever I am comparing Ardbeg 10yo against Laphroaig 10yo, Ardbeg wins on dry days, and Laphroaig tastes better on humid days.

Although I cannot say I'm particularly affected by temperature or seasonal climatic changes I think your point may be valid. There's far more to climate than temperature alone as exemplified by the difference between dry inland climate and damp/humid coastal climate. You can go skiing in sunshine and -30 degrees celcius and still feel it's tolerable but doing the same in a coastal climate would be very uncomfortable.
So, if one feels susceptible to changes in weather and moods or taste for whisky I suppose humidity in the air can do the same.

I for one prefers the comfort of staying inside with my whisky :wink:

Christian
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Postby Paul A Jellis » Thu Mar 30, 2006 11:46 pm

I don't drink anything on a 'dry' day. . .

Cheers

Paul
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Apr 01, 2006 7:44 pm

I drank some Arbeg 10 out of a quaich one evening outside. It was the sweetest, lightest taste I've experienced from that distillery. I could have downed the whole bottle theer and then.
I put it down to the atmospherics at the time and the freshness of the air, lifting and reviving the spirit. Could have been humidity - could have been nature taking care of its own! (sorry - bit hippyish :roll: )

It is a good point which I've not considered before. It adds to the rich mix that makes drinking whisky so enjoyable. It's not just another drink - so much comes into play. The whisky itself is complex enough before all the external factors that really do have an influence on the flavours come into play. I take my hat off to blenders who are able to detect so many elements and produce such consistent products. They have their set routine, of course, but then so do most of us. I usually drink around the same time when my labours are done, yet I find that every dram is different, it noses differently- damn it every sip is different!

Contrary to what has been said above, I think Ardbeg is better on a damp day - after all look where it comes from? I think the Speys and Highlands would be suited to drier days - but I'll need to experiment. Yippee - any excuse :lol:
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Postby irishwhiskeychaser » Sun Apr 02, 2006 3:38 pm

I can see that weather could have an effect on your tasting but I reckon that your own personal form(feeling) at the time has a major imput into how you taste. Sub consiously we do feel differently during different times of the day and this would also be true during different weather periods. As said previously there are so many different factors that it is probably hard to pin down and probably a combination of a lot of variables.
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