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My Yamazaki 12yo tasting notes

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Related whiskies : Yamazaki 12 Years Old

My Yamazaki 12yo tasting notes

Postby EdipisReks » Mon Dec 11, 2006 11:13 pm

i've noticed that there aren't a ton of tasting notes for the Japanese whiskies, so i thought that, since i'm half way through a bottle and have a pretty good handle on the profile, i would contribute with the only Japanese whisky i've been able to get my hot little hands on. for a baseline, all of my tastings are from a Glencairn glass, served neat.

Color: a clear, brownish gold.

Nose: cider vinegar, grass, paper, slight perfume

Palate: more cider vinegar, pepper, oak and vanilla.

Finish: dry, slightly floral, fading to a kind of yeasty bread.

i find the Yamazaki 12yo to be somewhat weird: where i would expect smoke from most Scotches (even the least smokey to my tongue, like Aberlour 10yo), i instead find cider vinegar. it's quite good, but for $35 i would rather be drinking Highland Park 12yo, one of my all time favorite drams. i would certainly spend the extra $10 for Ardbeg TEN or Laphroaig 10, if i were simply buying a bottle to drink and enjoy (as opposed to experimenting), but i'm glad i bought the bottle. it's an intriguing whisky, and i look forward to trying more Japanese whiskies in the future.

i hope this has been helpful for anyone interested in trying the Yamazaki.
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Postby Mustardhead » Mon Dec 11, 2006 11:39 pm

Although I can't see myself buying full bottles of Japanese whiskies I'm interested in trying a few. So thanks for the notes!
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Postby EdipisReks » Mon Dec 11, 2006 11:49 pm

my pleasure :)
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Postby Di Blasi » Tue Dec 12, 2006 1:10 am

I have only good things to say about Japanese whisky! Yes, the Yamazaki 12y too! I had a taste of one of their single casks, just for the Japanese market, that was outstanding! Good stuff!!
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Postby Oliver » Tue Dec 12, 2006 2:01 am

Wow, this cider smell doesn't sound too great! I am hoping to get a Yama 12 for Xmas, I hope it tastes better than that sounded !
I thought the 18 was absolutely top-notch!

Cheers for the notes anyhow!
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Postby EdipisReks » Tue Dec 12, 2006 2:08 am

don't get me wrong, the cider vinegariness isn't bad, it's just different. i had some friends try this bottle as well, and without any prompting they came up with cider vinegar too (well, one described it as vinegar and apples, but close enough), so it's not just me. it might just be barrel variation, as i haven't had any other samples. definitely a unique whisky. i like it, i just like others better.
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Postby Drrich1965 » Tue Dec 12, 2006 2:16 am

From my tasting narratives....

Score 73 (for me that is just below "average", which is 75.)

Japanese Yamazaki 12yo (43%, OB, Suntory, circa 2006) August 30th, sample from Scott P., Thanks Scott! My first Japanese whisky, and the one made semi-famous by one of my favorite movies, Lost in Translation. Nose: Sweet at first, I am reminded of cotton candy or watermelon flavored candies. After a few minutes oak, now the sweetness is clearly coming from the oak. Very interesting and enjoyable nose. Mouth: Oh, not nearly as nice as the nose. Very oak dominated, and the taste is actually on the bitter side. What happened to that sweetness? A feint saltiness but far too off in the distance and fleeting. Finish is long but slightly bitter, mouth coating but not in a yummy way. I am left with this taste in my mouth that almost tastes like my gums have been bleeding (I checked, they are not). I would say this is one to smell all day and pound if you want to get a bit drunk. Perhaps not as bad as I am making it sound, and I am tasting it 15 minutes after my first time tasting Connemara Cask Strength, which is a joy).
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Postby Ed » Thu Dec 14, 2006 4:59 pm

I haven't had the 12. I have a bottle of the Yamazaki 10 though. Just poured a little now. I don't think I would have thought of cider vinigar, but I can see what you mean. Little or no smoke. Some sherry, sweet. Hmm. Noticing a little smoke in the nose now, still little in the taste or finish.

You guys should try Yoichi!

Ed
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Postby EdipisReks » Thu Dec 14, 2006 5:11 pm

i would love to try Yoichi.
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Postby badams » Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:18 pm

Yoichi 10 is supposed to be one of the best japanese whiskies, but I have not been able to find even Yamazaki. Anyone know where it can be ordered and shipped to Texas?
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Postby Deactivated Member » Sat Dec 16, 2006 1:11 am

I don't know that it's possible to ship to Texas at all. In their caveats re shipping to the US, for example, Loch Fyne Whiskies notes that "Texas will destroy the goods immediately."
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Postby Ed » Sat Dec 16, 2006 2:03 pm

MrTattieHeid wrote:I don't know that it's possible to ship to Texas at all. In their caveats re shipping to the US, for example, Loch Fyne Whiskies notes that "Texas will destroy the goods immediately."


Good point Mr TattieHeid. Before asking if you can get it shipped ask if you can receive it. Nebraska, where I hail from, allowed whiskey to be shipped in, but not wine. I think this has been changed now.

Liquor laws in the States are a ridiculous patchwork.

Ed
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Postby shoganai » Sun Dec 24, 2006 3:08 am

I found a bottle of this in Connecticut about a month ago. I really enjoyed it, and I'm tempted to go hunting for another one next time I'm in the area.

My question is what is supposed to distinguish Japanese whiskey from Scotch?

Anyway, here are my notes. Keep in mind that I'm still refining my palate so take these for what they're worth. I don't recall any cider notes, but I'd love to give it another try with that in mind. I'd recommend this whiskey to anyone who wants to try something a little different and doesn't want to drain their savings account.

Nose: deep, sweet, vanilla(?)
Body: medium/heavy, smooth
Palate: HONEY, oak, walnut
Finish: a little spiciness appears and the oakiness lingers for a bit
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Postby shoganai » Sun Dec 24, 2006 3:14 am

Ed wrote:Liquor laws in the States are a ridiculous patchwork.


Tell me about it. I live in PA where it's all controlled very tightly by the State. The stock & prices are strictly regulated. The malts they stock are decent and the prices aren't outrageous, but it sucks if you're ever in the mood to try something different.

About 8 months ago the Liquor Control Board decided they didn't want to stock Ardbeg, so now I have to drive to friggin' Jersey to get a bottle.
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Postby Ed » Sun Dec 24, 2006 7:34 am

shoganai wrote:My question is what is supposed to distinguish Japanese whiskey from Scotch?



Well, not that much, as far as I am concerned. Of course, Scotch must be made in Scotland or it can't be called that. The Japanese distillers have all modeled their whiskies after those of Scotland. Takatsuru, the founder of Nikka, built his distillery in the town of Yoichi here in Hokkaido after having studied in Scotland and marrying a Scotish woman that he met there. He chose Yoichi because it closely matched the climate of Scotland. The stills were made in
Scotland even the architecture resembles a Scotish distillery. He studied in Glasgow from 1918 to 1921 when he returned to Japan and made the first whisky in this country at the Yamazaki distillery, which he established. Yamazaki, of course, belongs to Suntory now.

With that kind of foundation, it isn't at all surprising that Japanese whisky closely resembles Scotch.

Ed
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Related whiskies : Yamazaki 12 Years Old

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