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Glenmorangie

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Glenmorangie

Postby xcel » Fri Mar 02, 2007 6:49 am

I really enjoy Glenmorangie and I know most of my friends (Who aren't whisky drinkers) also enjoy it. What would you guys compare Glenmorangie to? What other whiskys have the similar tasting profile as the morangie.

I want to have my friends drink other single malts but within the same arena as the morangie 10.
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Postby laphroaig10_65 » Fri Mar 02, 2007 9:58 am

I'd try Highland Park and Oban.
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Postby Ann-Helen » Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:01 am

Old pultney 12 yo is a very nice whisky ,I`d say if you like glenmorangie You would probably like Old pultney too.
there`s alot of whiskies that are similar, not the same , f ex Blair Atholl , linkwood , glen goyne ,Glen garioch . These are just ontop of my head.
there are several whiskies that are easily likeable (if you can say that)
which the Glenmorangie is .
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Postby Scotchio » Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:03 am

I like Glenmorangie 10, the other bottlings they do all offer different twists on the style and are well worth exploring. As for other similar styles. I'd suggest Old Pulteney 12, and perhaps young( 10 to 14 yr) bottlings of Scapa( Gordon and Mcphail not the OB which is fruitier) Jura and tullibardine( ideally Connoissures Choice 1994). These all are relatively light whiskies which to my palate at least seem to share some of the morangie qualities/flavours.

The above mentioned Highland Park is a good whisky but I wouldnt consider it to be in a similar style to Glenmorangie, likewise Glen Garioch which seems closer to Highland Park and Bunnahabhain to me ( although I've only had the current 15 so other bottlings may be different)
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:16 am

I agree with Highland Park but I would also recommend Glenrothes.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Mar 02, 2007 12:24 pm

I'd say Innes and Gunn beer has a similar taste profile.
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Postby Scotchio » Fri Mar 02, 2007 12:48 pm

Nick Brown wrote:I'd say Innes and Gunn beer has a similar taste profile.


Dry
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Mar 02, 2007 1:14 pm

I was thinking more in terms of heavy wood influence - a vanilla bitterness - and a clean malty flavour with some delicate sweet fruit in the background (lemon, grape, etc.)

Some bourbon Tullibardines are also quite similar to Glenmorangie.
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Postby Scotchio » Fri Mar 02, 2007 1:22 pm

Nick Brown wrote:I was thinking more in terms of heavy wood influence - a vanilla bitterness - and a clean malty flavour with some delicate sweet fruit in the background (lemon, grape, etc.)

Some bourbon Tullibardines are also quite similar to Glenmorangie.


Sorry Nick, for a moment there i thought you were being facetious,heaven forbid. :shock:
Sounds like an interesting beer, I should try to track some down.
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Postby peergynt323 » Fri Mar 02, 2007 1:59 pm

I think the closest is Cragganmore. Rosebank is like Glenmorangie with a flowery lowland twist. But if you want to step into the realm of highland addiction, try independent bottlings of Clynelish.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Fri Mar 02, 2007 2:39 pm

I have seen threads before that have tried to pinpoint Glenmorangie in terms of other distilleries. I think Glenmorangie has a very unusual and distinctive flavour as I described above. But the overall predominant flavours are vanilla and malt in a very sweet, creamy mix. I am honestly surprised by some of the suggestions that others make, and even more surprised on other threads to see people describe Glenmorangie as light, bland or nondescript.
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Postby Scotchio » Fri Mar 02, 2007 3:13 pm

Nick Brown wrote:I have seen threads before that have tried to pinpoint Glenmorangie in terms of other distilleries. I think Glenmorangie has a very unusual and distinctive flavour as I described above. But the overall predominant flavours are vanilla and malt in a very sweet, creamy mix. I am honestly surprised by some of the suggestions that others make, and even more surprised on other threads to see people describe Glenmorangie as light, bland or nondescript.


Relatively light in body but not in flavour. Also seems quite spicy to me and I often think I can detect salt and faint peat. It's also a whisky where you seem to pick up different things each time you drink it. Sometimes it seems sweet even a little grassy , others it seems drier and the vanilla seems to get more pronounced the longer the bottle is open. Brilliant stuff at any price.
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Postby Photon » Fri Mar 02, 2007 5:40 pm

The 15yo "New Wood" is very spicy, the standard 10yo is more creamy.

If the 10 was what you and your friends liked, I'd point you at Glenrothes.

If it was the 15, I'd lean towards Bunnahabhain.

Actually the best reccommendation I can give is that every time you are at a bar that has malts, try a new one. You never know what will strike your fancy.

-P.
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Postby Reggaeblues » Fri Mar 02, 2007 7:57 pm

"It's also a whisky where you seem to pick up different things each time you drink it."

Yup. Never the same twice. But always enjoyable. That's quite a recommendation...the world's best introductory mallt IMO.

...and I speak as an Islay Junkie !
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Postby Mustardhead » Fri Mar 02, 2007 11:07 pm

I am a big fan of Glenmorangie. The 15 and 18 are fabulous and I am rather partial to the Artisan Cask and Cellar 13 but the standard 10 takes some beating. I have even sipped a dram of 10 after some heavy Islays and it reveals new depths.
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Mar 05, 2007 10:32 am

Reggaeblues wrote:"the world's best introductory mallt IMO.

What patronizing rubbish. Glenmorangie is one of the most complex malts on the market and it deserves better than being written off in this way.
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Postby les taylor » Mon Mar 05, 2007 10:42 am

Nick I don't think ReggaeBlues was writing it off. IN the UK its one of the Cheapest Ten year old Malts on the shelf. Hence probably introductory in it would be something the newcomer to the world of whisky would try first.


:)
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Postby Ann-Helen » Mon Mar 05, 2007 10:58 am

I`m sorry if I`m medling here but why so Angry ,Nick Brown?
I don`t see whats patronizing about that sentence.
It doesn`t offend me I like glenmorangie it`s one of my favorites.
I think it is complex but yet so easily likeable for everyone (almost everyone )
I just want to say this is HIS opinion and he actually can think that if he wants to. :)
you can have your opinion to ,but don`t bite people`s head of for nothing.
Lets be Nice to eachother. :)
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Postby Deactivated Member » Mon Mar 05, 2007 12:09 pm

Apologies - I wasn't angry but the trouble with type is that emotion doesn't come across.

In other threads, people have repeatedly dissed Glenmorangie as a beginners' malt, being simple and lacking strong flavours. I had read the "introductory malt" in that light. If I got it wrong, then I'm sorry.
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Postby bamber » Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:49 pm

Rather unique profile - especially the wonderful 10yo.

It is delicate, a little flowery, a little bit salty / sea air, some vanilla. Nothing is really quite like it.

I would recommend other speysiders. Glenlivet, Glenfiddich and Macallan Fine Oak would do.
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Postby Frodo » Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:52 pm

The closest I've gotten to Glenmorangie 10 is Speyburn (although it was a Provenance bottling), Strathisla, and Balblair 16.

In comparison, I find the Glenfiddich more creamy, the Glenlevit more fruity than Glenmorangie.
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Postby bamber » Tue Mar 06, 2007 1:22 pm

I thought of Balblair too - not easily available though.
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Postby toshie » Tue Mar 06, 2007 2:03 pm

bamber wrote:I thought of Balblair too - not easily available though.


Get it while you can. There's a new style coming out as vintage bottlings and a premium price. 1979 – 46% (70cl) £84.99; 1989 – 43% (70cl) £39.95 and 1977 43% (70cl) £27.99
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Postby bamber » Tue Mar 06, 2007 2:51 pm

I'm enjoying a Cadenhead's bottling of the stuff currently.
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Postby BruceCrichton » Tue Mar 06, 2007 8:13 pm

Try Glen Moray.

Also try Glenmorangie's wood finishes. The Golden Rum (from Sainsbury's), the Port wood and the 15 year old are all excellent.

If you can get any, try the Cellar 13 (100% first fill bourbon) and the 100 proof (my mate's mate got it from an airport).

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Postby Admiral » Wed Mar 07, 2007 3:57 am

There are some interesting recommendations being made above.

If I had to categorise the standard Glenmorangie 10yo, I would describe it as being extremely light, fragrant, and delicate.

In contrast to this, some people above have recommended relatively heavy, robust, and/or more full-flavoured malts. I'm not convinced some of these recommendations are actually comparable whiskies.

Glenlivet 12yo is probably in the same category, and is worth recommending in this instance.

Cheers,
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Postby Reggaeblues » Wed Mar 07, 2007 10:21 am

Thanks for sticking up for me Les and Ann-Helen! Well, Nick, all I will say is your "emotion" betrays a passion for a very fine whisky!

I did say that as an "Islay Junkie" (who currently has open 4 Ardbegs, 2 Lags, two Laphroaigs, and can't wait to get my hands on the 2 new Bowmores I sampled last week) that Glenmorangie is, nonetheless, always enjoyed by yours truly, and "never the same twice" which betrays my regard for its complexity...

The "introductory" appraisal is yet another plus IMO, and born of the experience of one who loves to "introduce" people to whisky. I'll retell this story. New year's eve 2005. Back home after a great gig. Sitting with young girl singer who is getting a cold. I'm ringing in the early hours of the new year with an Ardbeg 10, a Balvenie SB...and a Glenmorangie 10!

To allay her oncoming cold I offer the "medicinal" Ardbeg. oo,er...a bit too much. i offer the 'morangie. she likes it . I offer the Balvenie. not sure. Back to the 'morangie. she falls in love with it, and has never been without a bottle since! In fact, she called me 2 weeks ago to say she'd skipped work, and ws in a bar enjoying... Talisker! We did a gig last week and all they had was the "trad" beginners malt- Glenfiddich. guess what-she thought it was crap!

Another story. the late great racing driver Ayrton Senna was introduced to whisky by the former Formula One doctor Sid Watkins. his favourite whisky? Glenmorangie!

It's a great dram, perhaps the best "light" whisky i've tasted, always reliable...apart from Bladnoch 10, but where can you get that these days for less than twice the price ??
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Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 07, 2007 11:03 am

Reggaeblues - I'm not trying to pick a fight, but I think you have some ideas about whisky with which I don't agree. You speak of Glenmorangie as being a light whisky - what exactly do you mean? It sounds to me like damning with faint praise.

You also, in common with many Islay fans, seem to feel that there is something macho about being able to take Islay - c.f. your comment about Ardbeg being too much.

Personally, my friends and I drank peaty Islays from very early on. I think Islay whisky is ideal for beginners as there is nothing terribly complex about most of it - the flavour is immediately obvious even if you just swallow it down and, frankly, it doesn't take much understanding. Some of us then came to appreciate the compexity and range of flavours in other whiskies whilst the others just keep on about how peaty their latest dram is and how sure they are that most people couldn't take it. Actually, I think anyone who has smoked cigarettes can handle the peat quite happily... But I think it takes more experience to understand Highland malts fully as there is simply more going on on the palate.
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Postby Scotchio » Wed Mar 07, 2007 11:34 am

What if we all just replaced the word light with subtle, complex and well balanced ? :idea:
Besides for an Islayphile Glenmorangie is compritively light in flavour and body, it can be taken as much as a compliment as a critisism.
RBs appreciation of Glenmorangie 10 surely implies that one day he could escape the evil clutches of peatocentricity( if he so wishes) and flit butterfly like from distillery to distillery feasting on the gentle nectars within and peering zenlike into the limpid pools of clarity and complexity they offer. :D
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Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 07, 2007 11:43 am

Scotchio wrote:What if we all just replaced the word light with subtle and well balanced ? :idea:


I don't think it is subtle. I think it is complex. Subtle is just a euphemism for bland. I agree about the well balanced, though - and I would add that Glenmorangie seems to have a flavour journey - a sequencing of the flavours - that few whiskies achieve. Interestingly, though, the other one that I always think of in terms of journeys is Talisker!
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Postby les taylor » Wed Mar 07, 2007 11:57 am

In the discussion about Whisky for sale. Their seemed to be a consencus of opinion that if buyers and sellers viewed each other as friends that would help the function of the Whisky for Sale aspect of these forums to work better.

I wonder if we were not to impute wrong motives to each other here, rather allow each person to have an opinion even if it did match our own, it might help. Although you might be of the opinion a good old row is just what's needed. I don't know, maybe a quiet life is more pleasant, without being bland.

:)
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Postby Deactivated Member » Wed Mar 07, 2007 12:03 pm

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Postby Reggaeblues » Wed Mar 07, 2007 1:16 pm

Oh dear! I feel a bit like the guy in the Monty Python sketch who keeps saying the wrong word!

..or, "Dont' mention the war!" - Fawlty towers.

Guests just arrived. will return...
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Postby Ann-Helen » Wed Mar 07, 2007 1:21 pm

Didn`t I tell you boys to play nicely ?! :)
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Postby les taylor » Wed Mar 07, 2007 2:45 pm

Nick what does the yellow word say. Its so washed out I can't make it out.


:?
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