Not a member? - Register and login now.
All registered users can read our entire magazine archive.

Issue 119 - Noise annoys

Whisky Magazine Issue 119
April 2014

 

Copyright Whisky Magazine © 1999-2014. All rights reserved. To use or reproduce part or all of this article please contact us for details of how you can do so legally.

Noise annoys

Turn down the volume and listen to the world

The fact that I don't drive (with this job?) is one of the reasons I have no interest in Formula One racing. As the idea of watching people driving around in a circle for a day leaves me cold, I must have been bored when I picked up a paper and began reading about it.

Apparently there have been complaints from those on high that it is too quiet and they are thinking of changing the rules (again) to ensure that the cars are both safer (probably a good thing, though I suspect people go hoping there will be crashes) but still noisy. According to Bernie Ecclestone, the cars “don't sound like racing cars.” For John Surtees, the emotion of the event was linked to the noise, and Derek Warwick opined that, “you lose that sense of speed when you don't get the sound.” It was the last one which piqued my interest as it not only backs up my theory that you can't actually see anything at F1, it suggests that people don't need to. The noise is all.

How like whisky, I mused to myself (I was in a musing sort of mood). Brand owners use ‘noise' to refer to activity. One of the issues facing whisky is that the ‘noise' in the category means that it is difficult for a new voices to be heard. This means that new brands either make more noise (which usually means spending lots of money, or doing something weird … sometimes both) or making a more interesting noise, which is more difficult.

Noise, for me, can also mean flavour. Noise is rarely subtle. My ears were ringing for two we...

To read all of this article...
Please register with whiskymag.com. Already registered? Login now.

 

Whisky gift and present finder