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Issue 135 - It's All About The Kit

Whisky Magazine Issue 135
April 2016


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It's All About The Kit

The dying art of rousing

All Scotch whisky distilleries are not the same. Wherever and whenever you visit, the distillery will make a big deal out of the unique qualities that their particular apparatus makes to the whisky making process. The Kit is a new, regular feature where we'll look in-depth at a single piece of equipment used in the production of Scotch whisky. It could be a vintage tool used by a cooper, a peat-cutting implement, a historic drum malting, or a cask stencil, but this is where you come in. We are looking for your help to pinpoint interesting pieces of kit from across Scotland so that we can share them with Whisky Magazine readers around the globe. Next time you spot some nifty, jaw-dropping piece of distillery equipment, drop me a line at or tweet us @Whisky_Magazine #whiskykit. You never know, your suggestion may be selected to feature in the next issue!

To kick us off, we're heading to Glenturret Distillery, near Crieff, Scotland's oldest distillery and home to The Famous Grouse Experience. However, we're not here for the catchy jingles and dancing game birds. We're here for the kit.

Glenturret Distillery maintains the last hand-operated mashtun in Scotland. We're not talking about manually operated pumps here; this is difficult, arduous work. Their stainless steel mashtun was built by Forsyth's of Rothes, and holds 1.1 tons of grist, the milled malted barley. This is mixed with 5,200 litres of sparge from an overhead spout. Now, think of traditional op...

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