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Issue 136 - Q & A

Whisky Magazine Issue 136
June 2016


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Q & A

John Campbell explains the story behind Laphroaig Lore

Why is it called Laphroaig Lore?
To answer this, we would look no further than the dictionary definition of Lore. ‘A body of traditions passed down through generations usually by word of mouth.' We've been making whisky at Laphroaig for the last 200 years and our expertise and knowledge is handed down through generations from distillery manager to distillery manager, so for us the name Lore is a nod to the generations of expertise and knowledge that have been used to create this new expression.

What is different about the way you created it compared to previous Laphroaigs?
Over the past ten years, the main new expressions have taken Laphroaig filled into ex-Bourbon barrels and then given the whisky a second or third maturation. Prior to Beam purchasing Laphroaig distillery, all ‘new make' Laphroaig was filled into ex-Bourbon barrels.

After the purchase of the distillery, new make Laphroaig was also filled into first and second fill Oloroso
sherry hogsheads, first and second fill quarter casks and once used ex-Laphroaig barrels. The marriage of these different cask types with some double matured (Bourbon and virgin European oak barrels) makes Lore unique to Laphroaig.

Approximately what spread of ages does it comprise of, and which cask types predominate?
The age range for Lore is between seven and 21 years old. The Laphroaig distillery owner hadn't filled anything other than ex-Bourbon barrels since the 90s so this gave us an opportunity in looking to our forebears fo...

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