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Whisky Magazine Issue 34

Whisky Magazine Issue 34

Whisky Magazine Issue 34

In this issue - Sean Connery - East meets West - Irish Coffee - Whisky and sushi

Published October 2003

The Miller's Tale
Last Thursday I met two men who had bought distilleries in the last month: Michael Beamish and Leonard Russell. For me they represent the joyful polarity of the whisky industry. Michael was on time a...

October 2003, Issue 34, page 5

The Buddha of Bourbon
Michael Jackson has a vision, and learns why the Japanese sit on the floor to eat dinner

October 2003, Issue 34, page 11

Tomorrow's World
Innovation in the world of whisky? It's all over the place, argues Dave Broom

October 2003, Issue 34, page 12

Putting money where your mouth is
Keep advertising and advertising will keep you”, famously quipped whisky baron Tommy Dewar. He was renowned for advertising firsts and for the lavish promotional budgets that built the Dewar's brand...

October 2003, Issue 34, page 20

The last show in town (Springbank)
Campbeltown was once a thriving centre for whisky production. Now little remains. Is Springbank worth the journey? Our mystery visitor made the lengthy trek to find out

October 2003, Issue 34, page 24

Kentucky Roses (Four Roses)
Four Roses has thrived since it was bought by Japanese brewer Kirin. Stuart MacLean Ramsay found out why.

October 2003, Issue 34, page 28

Chills and thrills (Yoichi)
Dave Broomtries to discover the secret of Nikka by visiting its North Japanese Yoichi distillery

October 2003, Issue 34, page 32

On the fashion trail
The Lonsdale in London recently hosted a Whisky Magazine cocktail challenge. Dominic Roskrow spoke to general manager Henry Besant.

October 2003, Issue 34, page 37

Protective Shields (Robin Shields)
Robin Shields isn't from Islay. He's not Scottish. And he doesn't have a distillery background. But as Martine Nouet finds out, he's up for the challenge of protecting the reputation of Laphroaig

October 2003, Issue 34, page 40

Lead on Macduff
Speyside's most eastern distillery is something of an enigma, but it's not without influence. Ian Buxton paid it a visit.

October 2003, Issue 34, page 44

The strange case of the Bothy Still
Gavin D Smith looks at how Diageo's forerunners flirted with the idea of launching a ‘boutique' distillery based on an illegal operation – and how it ended up on the shelf

October 2003, Issue 34, page 48

Keeping up appearances
Whisky is a central part of the main character in Graham Greene's The Human Factor says Jefferson Chase

October 2003, Issue 34, page 51

How the hot toddy took flight
Irish Coffee is known and loved across the world, but how did this happen? Peter Mulryan shows how it first took off.

October 2003, Issue 34, page 52

How the hot toddy took flight (Irish Coffee)
Irish Coffee is known and loved across the world, but how did this happen? Peter Mulryan shows how it first took off

October 2003, Issue 34, page 52

A fishy tale
In the latest in an occasional series of matching whisky with food, Dave Broom compares and contrasts some sushi-whisky combinations

October 2003, Issue 34, page 61

Lets do the char char
The cask plays a major role in the flavour of whisky. Ian Wisnieski takes a closer look at how they end up sitting in a warehouse for years

October 2003, Issue 34, page 64

Haydock gets sexed up
Is the great John Haydock rattled? It would seem so. Here he goes on the defensive and answers his critics

October 2003, Issue 34, page 74

World Whiskies Awards 2007 - World's Best New Release - Winner Whisky Magazine - Editors Choice - Winner

The Balvenie 1972 Vintage Cask
Single Malt - Scotland - 49.40%
9 The ultimate dessert dram. Beautifully composed.

Whisky Magazine - Recommended - Winner

Glenfiddich 1973 Vintage Reserve
Single Malt - Scotland - 49.50%
8 Luxurious and sweet, but background is gently dry. Deftly balanced and sophisticated, as ever.

Bunnahabhain 1963
Single Malt - Scotland - 42.90%
8 The Islay origins become more obvious the more mature Bunnahabhain is. This one would be comfortable in distant Cathay or in Tokyo or even 42nd Street.

Glen Garioch 12 Years Old, National Trust for Scotland bottling
Single Malt - Scotland - 47.40%
7 Approachable and enjoyable, but a little mild-mannered for me. Bring back the peat…please!

Hakushu 1982 Sherry Cask
Single Malt - Japan - 61.00%
7 I would love this whisky if it had a little less wood. I want to love it anyway, but in the end the wood defeats me.

Hakushu 1984 White Oak Cask
Single Malt - Japan - 61.00%
8 Its edgy assertiveness might bother aesthetes but I warm to a whisky that knows its own mind.

Hakushu 1988 Bourbon Cask
Single Malt - Japan - 61.00%
8 Lean, limber and characteristically smoky. A clear sense of Hakushu malt without heavy wood influence.

Hakushu 30th Anniversary Bottling
Single Malt - Japan - 43.00%
8 A beautifully composed whisky. No aggression, but a great sense of authority.

Springbank 25 Years Old, Frank McHardy Bottling
Single Malt - Scotland - 46.00%
8 Springbank can sound like a fruit salad, but the whisky has a lot of authority.

The Whisky Shop Brora 30 Years Old
Single Malt - Scotland - 47.40%
7 For the collector.

Yamazaki 80th Anniversary Bottling
Single Malt - Japan - 43.00%
8 A lovely, elegant, delicately malty Yamazaki.

Authors this issue

 

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